Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Male Infertility: Scientists Discover Candidate Gene For Impaired Spermatogenesis

Date:
July 5, 2001
Source:
European Society For Human Reproduction And Embryology
Summary:
Researchers in the Netherlands believe they have identified a gene that is involved in causing infertility in men. Dr Judith Gianotten told the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology annual meeting in Lausanne that the ZNF214 gene is probably a candidate gene for impaired spermatogenesis (an inability to make enough sperm cells).

Lausanne, Switzerland -- Researchers in the Netherlands believe they have identified a gene that is involved in causing infertility in men.

Related Articles


Dr Judith Gianotten told the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology annual meeting in Lausanne today (Wednesday 4 July) that the ZNF214 gene is probably a candidate gene for impaired spermatogenesis (an inability to make enough sperm cells).

Now they are testing the gene in human testicle cells and mice to discover exactly what role the gene plays in the production (or not) of sperm cells. An understanding of how it works may help researchers in the future to design ways of targeting the gene and developing treatments to men affected by this form of infertility.

Dr Gianotten, a researcher from the Center for Reproductive Medicine at the Amsterdam Academic Medical Center, told the conference that the ZNF214 gene mainly expresses itself in the testis and is located on chromosome 11p15. This part of the chromosome is linked to the Beckwith Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) – a complex overgrowth disorder, which often involves boys being born with undescended testicles (cryptorchidism) who suffer from infertility as adults1. She said: "For these reasons we hypothesized that ZNF214 could be involved in male subfertility and we decided to test whether this was the case.

"First we investigated whether this gene was associated with impaired spermatogenesis. We found a significantly different distribution of DNA variations in this gene2 in patients with low fertility compared with the control group, which indicated that the gene was indeed associated. So we screened the gene for mutations in men suffering from infertility due to impaired spermatogenesis."

The researchers took DNA from 77 men with very low sperm counts and compared it with DNA from a control group of 65 men with normal sperm counts. In three patients from the infertile group, three new mutations of the ZNF214 gene were found. These mutations were not found amongst the control group.

For two of the patients in whom a mutation was found DNA from their parents was available, and this showed that in both cases the mutation had been inherited from their mothers. All three patients appeared to be normal in every other respect, and none had any symptom of BWS. One of them had a medical history of cryptorchidism.

Dr Gianotten said: "These results suggest that the ZNF214 gene is involved in impaired spermatogenesis, either on its own, or because it causes cryptorchidism which in turn leads to impaired spermatogenesis. In this study only one of the patients in which a mutation was found reported a history of cryptorchidism. This might indicate the involvement of ZNF214 in impaired spermatogenesis on its own. However, it is also possible that ZNF214 is a disease-causing gene for cryptorchidism.

"The fact that the mutation in the gene appears to be inherited from the mother explains how subfertility due to impaired spermatogenesis can be passed on to the next generation. If it was inherited from the father then the mutation would become extinct in the population."

Dr Gianotten said more research was needed to confirm the findings. "At the moment we are preparing studies to see how the gene is expressed in different cell types of human testicles, and we are looking for the identical gene in mice to test the function of the gene and its mutation."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by European Society For Human Reproduction And Embryology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

European Society For Human Reproduction And Embryology. "Male Infertility: Scientists Discover Candidate Gene For Impaired Spermatogenesis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 July 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/07/010704092511.htm>.
European Society For Human Reproduction And Embryology. (2001, July 5). Male Infertility: Scientists Discover Candidate Gene For Impaired Spermatogenesis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/07/010704092511.htm
European Society For Human Reproduction And Embryology. "Male Infertility: Scientists Discover Candidate Gene For Impaired Spermatogenesis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/07/010704092511.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

AFP (Nov. 24, 2014) — Madagascar said Monday it is trying to contain an outbreak of plague -- similar to the Black Death that swept Medieval Europe -- that has killed 40 people and is spreading to the capital Antananarivo. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) — A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins