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Surprising Link Between Body Size And Extinction Risk

Date:
September 24, 2001
Source:
Society For Conservation Biology
Summary:
Most of the Australian mammals that have gone extinct in the last 200 years were medium sized, and many biologists believe that this somehow predisposed them to extinction. New research debunks this belief and reveals another link between body size and extinction: small mammals are less likely to die out.
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Most of the Australian mammals that have gone extinct in the last 200 years were medium sized, and many biologists believe that this somehow predisposed them to extinction. New research debunks this belief and reveals another link between body size and extinction: small mammals are less likely to die out.

This work is presented in the October issue of Conservation Biology by Marcel Cardillo and Lindell Bromham, who did this work at the University of Queensland, Australia, and are now at the University of Sussex, UK.

Nearly half of all the mammals that have gone extinct worldwide in the last 200 years were Australian, and most of them were medium-sized (1.2 ounces - 12 pounds). Biologists theorized that Australian mammals in this so-called "Critical Weight Range" were more prone to extinction. While this theory has been widely accepted, it had not been tested rigorously.

To test this theory, Cardillo and Bromham did the first statistical analysis of weight and extinction risk in Australian mammals. The researchers considered 25 extinct and 16 endangered species.

Cardillo and Bromham discovered that the medium-sized mammals were not at greater risk of extinction. So why are most of Australia's extinct mammals medium-sized? The answer is simple: most of Australia's mammals happen to be medium- sized.

The researchers also found a new link between size and extinction risk: the smallest mammal species are the least vulnerable to extinction. Many Australian rodents weigh less than an ounce and some marsupials weigh less than a third of an ounce. Cardillo and Bromham speculate that these small species are more robust because they have high population densities and reproductive rates, which means they can recover quickly.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Society For Conservation Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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Society For Conservation Biology. "Surprising Link Between Body Size And Extinction Risk." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 September 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/09/010924062625.htm>.
Society For Conservation Biology. (2001, September 24). Surprising Link Between Body Size And Extinction Risk. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/09/010924062625.htm
Society For Conservation Biology. "Surprising Link Between Body Size And Extinction Risk." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/09/010924062625.htm (accessed August 29, 2015).

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