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Impact Events' Kinetic Energy May Be Key To Understanding The Severity Of Mass Extinctions

Date:
April 10, 2002
Source:
Geological Society Of America
Summary:
The kinetic energy created by asteroid and comet impacts with the Earth may be key to linking some impacts with mass extinction events. Michael Lucas, a geology student at Florida Gulf Coast University, believes that the severity of four extinction events during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic can be correlated with the total kinetic energy released by impacts that occur during the geologic age of the mass extinction.

The kinetic energy created by asteroid and comet impacts with the Earth may be key to linking some impacts with mass extinction events. Michael Lucas, a geology student at Florida Gulf Coast University, believes that the severity of four extinction events during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic can be correlated with the total kinetic energy released by impacts that occur during the geologic age of the mass extinction.

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Lucas will present his findings April 4 at the Geological Society of America’s North-Central Section and Southeastern Section Joint Meeting in Lexington, Kentucky.

Lucas analyzed the kinetic energy released by 31 of the largest impact structures from the last 248 million years and correlated them with the Norian, Tithonian, Late Eocene, and K-T extinction events. The impact energy released during the geologic ages of each extinction event is at least 10 million megatons of TNT equivalent yield per geologic age. Lucas believes that this could represent a minimum impact energy required to cause a global-scale mass extinction. His research results also reveal that synchronous multiple impact events could also have caused extinctions.

“Approximately ten percent of the impact structures on Earth are doublets or twin structures, suggesting a nearly simultaneous impact of binary asteroids or fragmented comets,” he said. An example of a twin impact structure would be the Kara / Ust-Kara twin impact structure in Russia which is about 73 million years old.


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The above story is based on materials provided by Geological Society Of America. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Geological Society Of America. "Impact Events' Kinetic Energy May Be Key To Understanding The Severity Of Mass Extinctions." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 April 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/04/020409074322.htm>.
Geological Society Of America. (2002, April 10). Impact Events' Kinetic Energy May Be Key To Understanding The Severity Of Mass Extinctions. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/04/020409074322.htm
Geological Society Of America. "Impact Events' Kinetic Energy May Be Key To Understanding The Severity Of Mass Extinctions." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/04/020409074322.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

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