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Researchers Identify A Gene Essential For The Natural Killer Cell Response Against Cancer

Date:
October 21, 2002
Source:
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Summary:
Scientists at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center have identified a gene called MEF that is essential to the development of Natural Killer cells and Natural Killer T-cells, which play a vital role in the innate immune system. Their findings are published as the cover study in the October 2002 issue of Immunity from Cell Press.

NEW YORK, October 16, 2002 - Two parts of the body's immune system are critical for its normal functioning. One of these, the innate immune component, must defend the body against onslaughts from foreign substances it has never before seen. Failure of the immune system can result in cancer, autoimmune disease, or life threatening viral infections.

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Scientists at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center have identified a gene called MEF that is essential to the development of Natural Killer cells and Natural Killer T-cells, which play a vital role in the innate immune system. Their findings are published as the cover study in the October 2002 issue of Immunity from Cell Press. "By understanding how the MEF protein promotes the development and function of natural killer cells, we will develop ways to help the innate immune system better recognize and kill cancer cells," said Stephen D. Nimer, M.D., head of the Division of Hematology Oncology and the study's senior author. "We are planning future studies to learn how this can improve bone marrow transplant strategies."

"The differential regulation of perforin gene expression in the innate versus the adaptive immune system provides a selective target for future therapeutic interventions," explained H. Daniel Lacorazza, Ph.D., the study's first author.

###

Note: This study entitled, "The ETS Protein MEF Plays a Critical Role in Perforin Gene Expressio and the Development of Natural Killer and NK-T Cells", is available on line at http://www.Immunity.com.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. "Researchers Identify A Gene Essential For The Natural Killer Cell Response Against Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 October 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/10/021021052417.htm>.
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. (2002, October 21). Researchers Identify A Gene Essential For The Natural Killer Cell Response Against Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/10/021021052417.htm
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. "Researchers Identify A Gene Essential For The Natural Killer Cell Response Against Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/10/021021052417.htm (accessed January 26, 2015).

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