Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Research Can Lead To Longer Shelf Life For Dairy Products

Date:
December 23, 2002
Source:
Texas A&M University - Agricultural Communications
Summary:
Research done by Texas A&M University graduate student Alexander Lin today may improve many dairy industry consumer products of tomorrow.

COLLEGE STATION – Research done by Texas A&M University graduate student Alexander Lin today may improve many dairy industry consumer products of tomorrow.

Lin's doctoral thesis involved research on "finding the mechanism of how the additives – including gums and phosphate salts – and homogenization pressure affect the quality of a type of dairy-based beverage during extended storage," he said.

In this research, Lin said, canned milk-based diet beverages and milk-based sports drinks that must have a long shelf life were tested to find how quality and length of storage could be improved. "We tried different ingredients to see how they affected quality – how different ingredients have different affects on quality.

"We also checked different processes," he said.

Eventually his research focused on a process called high pressure homogenization. This process was found extend shelf life of these beverages, while at the same time maintaining their quality and nutrient value.

Homogenization, a process that has been in use in the dairy industry for more than a century, involves subjecting dairy products to 2,000 to 3,000 pounds per square inch of pressure. This process results in fat globules that remain disbursed throughout the product, rather than separating and rising to the top the way cream does in non-homogenized milk, Lin said. However, in ordinary homogenization, these fat globules are not all the same size.

Lin decided to see what would happen if much more pressure was applied during the homogenization process. "The pressure we tested went up to 14,000 psi," he said.

The result was smaller, more uniformly-sized fat globules and a more stable product with a longer shelf life.

Lin's research could eventually impact the way many dairy products – including yogurt, skim and whole milk, Cheddar cheese and whey proteins – are processed.

If that happens, consumers will benefit, said Dr. Ronald Richter, professor in food science and committee chair for Lin's research, because "improving the processing will cause improvements in the physical properties and longer shelf life."

By keeping products useable longer, this process could also help cut down waste on the consumer level. And for many products, "you won't have to shake before you use," he added with a smile.

However, the researchers added, this process will increase shelf life before the product is opened, not after. "Once it's open, microbiological contamination by the consumer is the primary factor affecting shelf life," Lin said.

His research will have no effect on whether or not a product should be refrigerated – just on how long it can be used. "It's a method of processing, not storage," Lin said.

The research using high pressure homogenization will probably continue, even after Lin receives his doctorate degree in December, Richter said. "The research will be extended beyond beverages and how they can be controlled.

"We might even want to cause things to gel, like pudding. (If we can) control the functionality with this process – what you put on the surface of things affects how it will behave in different environments."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Texas A&M University - Agricultural Communications. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Texas A&M University - Agricultural Communications. "Research Can Lead To Longer Shelf Life For Dairy Products." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 December 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/12/021223084204.htm>.
Texas A&M University - Agricultural Communications. (2002, December 23). Research Can Lead To Longer Shelf Life For Dairy Products. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/12/021223084204.htm
Texas A&M University - Agricultural Communications. "Research Can Lead To Longer Shelf Life For Dairy Products." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/12/021223084204.htm (accessed September 19, 2014).

Share This



More Plants & Animals News

Friday, September 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: Elephant Undergoes Surgery in Tbilisi Zoo

Raw: Elephant Undergoes Surgery in Tbilisi Zoo

AP (Sep. 18, 2014) Grand the elephant has successfully undergone surgery to remove a portion of infected tusk at Tbilisi Zoo in Georgia. British veterinary surgeons used an electric drill to extract the infected piece. (Sept. 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chimp Violence Study Renews Debate On Why They Kill

Chimp Violence Study Renews Debate On Why They Kill

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) The study weighs in on a debate over whether chimps are naturally violent or become that way due to human interference in the environment. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Some Tobacco Farmers Thrive Amid Challenges

Some Tobacco Farmers Thrive Amid Challenges

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) The South's tobacco country is surviving, and even thriving in some cases, as demand overseas keeps growers in the fields of one of America's oldest cash crops. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Given Rare Glimpse of 350-Kilo Colossal Squid

Scientists Given Rare Glimpse of 350-Kilo Colossal Squid

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Scientists say a female colossal squid weighing an estimated 350 kilograms (770 lbs) and thought to be only the second intact specimen ever found was carrying eggs when discovered in the Antarctic. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins