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Environmental Satellite Readied To Detect Solar Storms

Date:
January 31, 2003
Source:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
Summary:
The nation's newest environmental satellite, GOES-12, is being readied for operations, NASA and the Commerce Department's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced. GOES-12 is equipped with an advanced instrument for real-time solar forecasting. The Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) aboard the satellite will enable forecasters and scientists to detect solar storms that could impact billions of dollars worth of assets.

January 30, 2003 -- The nation's newest environmental satellite, GOES-12, is being readied for operations, NASA and the Commerce Department's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced today.

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GOES-12 is equipped with an advanced instrument for real-time solar forecasting. The Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) aboard the satellite will enable forecasters and scientists to detect solar storms that could impact billions of dollars worth of assets.

"I want to offer my congratulations to the SXI partners on their significant achievements," said Dr. Richard Fisher, Director of the Sun Earth Connection Division at NASA Headquarters. "I view the initiation of the new SXI serivce as a victory for the national scientific research program. Yesterday's research mysteries have become the subjet of today's report on space weather conditions," he said.

The instrument will take a full-disk image of the sun's atmosphere once every minute. NOAA and the U.S. Air Force will use the images to monitor and forecast the sources of space weather disturbances from the sun. The images will enable forecasters to predict disturbances to Earth's space environment that can destroy satellite electronics, disrupt long-distance radio communications or surge power grids.

The ability to monitor and forecast solar disturbances is valuable to operators of military and civilian radio and satellite communications systems, navigation systems, astronauts, high-altitude aviators and scientists.

The SXI is a small telescope that makes use of advanced technology and grazing incidence optics to allow it to see the sun's outer atmosphere or corona in X-rays. SXI lets solar forecasters see phenomena they couldn't otherwise view, such as coronal holes, whose high-speed winds cause geomagnetic storms; and to infer solar activity occurring behind the sun's edge, or limb. X-ray images are more accurate than white light imagers for identifying the location of flares.

"NASA is excited about providing another fine tool for the NOAA team to use in weather operations, including space weather forecasts," said Martin A. Davis, NASA GOES program manager at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Md. GOES-12 represents a continuation of a 27-year joint program between NASA and NOAA.

The United States operates two environmental satellites in geostationary orbit 22,300 miles over the equator. GOES-12 was launched on July 23, 2001, and placed into on-orbit storage. Controllers at NOAA's Satellite Operations Control Center in Suitland, Md., are commanding the satellite out of storage and preparing it for operations.

NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service operates the GOES series of satellites. After the satellites complete on-orbit checkout, NOAA assumes responsibility for command and control, data receipt, product generation and distribution. GSFC manages the design, development and launch of the spacecraft for NOAA. The SXI was built by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. "Environmental Satellite Readied To Detect Solar Storms." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 January 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/01/030131080300.htm>.
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. (2003, January 31). Environmental Satellite Readied To Detect Solar Storms. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/01/030131080300.htm
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. "Environmental Satellite Readied To Detect Solar Storms." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/01/030131080300.htm (accessed January 27, 2015).

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