Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Protein That Predicts Tamoxifen Resistance Is Identified

Date:
December 8, 2003
Source:
Duke University Medical Center
Summary:
Researchers at the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a protein that breast cancer tumors over-produce when they become resistant to the drug tamoxifen.

DURHAM, N.C. -- Researchers at the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a protein that breast cancer tumors over-produce when they become resistant to the drug tamoxifen. The researchers said their finding could help them predict which tumors will benefit from tamoxifen -- the front-line drug used to treat operable breast cancer -- and which tumors won't.

Future studies will be able to determine if tumors that over-produce this protein, called MTA-1, could be treated with a different hormonal therapy following their initial treatment with surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation, said Kimberly Blackwell, M.D., assistant professor of oncology at the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Blackwell will present her team's findings on Dec. 4 at the 26th annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

Their latest findings supports last year's discovery, reported at the same annual meeting, in which Blackwell demonstrated that tamoxifen-resistant tumors actually change their cellular characteristics to become responsive to other types of drugs. Blackwell says that elevated levels of MTA-1 represent one of these cellular changes in tumors that stop responding to tamoxifen.

"MTA-1 is just one of the proteins that plays a role in tamoxifen resistance, but it is one important step toward helping us better target our therapies toward each woman's particular type of tumor," said Blackwell. "Theoretically, we could biopsy women at the time of diagnosis and select an alternative drug to tamoxifen if their tumors over-express MTA-1."

Furthermore, she said, MTA-1 is known to be a predictor of poor prognosis and the potential for breast cancer metastasis, so that testing for its presence prior to treatment could help them devise more aggressive strategies from the outset.

In years past, tamoxifen was the only option to help prevent breast cancers from recurring in women with estrogen-positive tumors, said Blackwell. But a percentage of women develop resistance to the drug.

To better understand this phenomenon, Blackwell and colleagues developed a strain of mice whose tumors eventually became resistant to tamoxifen. Once tamoxifen resistance was achieved, they conducted a gene array analysis to determine which genes were over-expressed in the new tumor line. They identified 20 different such genes, and found that MTA-1 was a gene that was strongly over-expressed in the tamoxifen-resistant tumors.

To date, scientists have found only a few other genes or proteins over-expressed in tamoxifen-resistant tumors, making the new discovery an important one for determining how a tumor will respond to treatment.

"We have a multitude of hormonally based drugs at our disposal that are designed to treat or prevent breast cancer and its recurrence," said Blackwell. "Our ultimate goal is to test tumors at the time of diagnosis to determine what their molecular signatures are and then to select the best therapy aimed at treating the tumor."

Other authors on the research team, all from Duke, include Mark Dewhirst, Ph.D., Donald McDonnell, Ph.D., Holly Dressman, M.D., Stacey A. Snyder, and Jeffrey R. Marks, Ph.D.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Duke University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Duke University Medical Center. "Protein That Predicts Tamoxifen Resistance Is Identified." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 December 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/12/031208141531.htm>.
Duke University Medical Center. (2003, December 8). Protein That Predicts Tamoxifen Resistance Is Identified. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/12/031208141531.htm
Duke University Medical Center. "Protein That Predicts Tamoxifen Resistance Is Identified." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/12/031208141531.htm (accessed April 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, April 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) President Barack Obama gave a briefing Thursday announcing 8 million people have signed up under the Affordable Care Act. He blasted continued Republican efforts to repeal the law. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) A recent study links apathetic feelings to a smaller brain. Researchers say the results indicate a need for apathy screening for at-risk seniors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins