Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists Provide New Understanding Of Manganites

Date:
June 14, 2004
Source:
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Summary:
University of California researchers working at Los Alamos National Laboratory recently unveiled a new theory explaining the strange coexistence of metallic and insulating phases in the crystals of a mineral called perovskite manganite.

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 3, 2004 -- University of California researchers working at Los Alamos National Laboratory recently unveiled a new theory explaining the strange coexistence of metallic and insulating phases in the crystals of a mineral called perovskite manganite. The theoretical framework they present could provide a basis for the engineering of nanoscale metallic and insulating phase patterns in manganites. Such phase patterns could be useful in the computer industry's quest to miniaturize computer disk drive heads beyond their current size limitations.

Related Articles


In a paper published in the March 25 issue of the scientific journal Nature, Los Alamos scientists Ken Ahn, Turab Lookman and Alan Bishop theorize that the presence of metallic and insulating phases in perovskite manganite are strain-induced, caused by pressures applied to the mineral's structure lattice during formation. Perovskite manganite, or manganite, is a steel-gray or black mineral that occurs as crystals of manganese ore. Perovskite refers to the cubic crystal form the manganite may take.

According to Lookman, a physicist in the Theoretical Division, a better understanding of the nanoscale structure of manganites is more than simply an academic adventure. "If the computer industry is going to continue to miniaturize electronics beyond silicon's current limitations, it will probably be necessary to look at materials like manganites, where, for example, nanoscale structures such as coexistent metallic and insulating phases can be built within media that are otherwise homogenous," Lookman said.

The evolution of computer drives has been made possible to a significant extent by a better understanding of magnetoresistance in materials. In 1988, a property called "gigantic magnetoresistance" (GMR) was discovered in certain materials that made them useful for creating better magnetic read heads for computer disk drives. In 1994, a more powerful magnetoresistance phenomenon known as "colossal magnetoresistance" (CMR) was discovered in manganite and other materials with perovskite crystalline structure that made them appealing to industry as potential materials for use in a new generation of miniature magnetic read heads for computer disk drives. While GMR-based technologies are now used in most hard drives, CMR has been less widely understood and therefore not been applied.

The Los Alamos discovery could lead to advanced electronic applications of CMR in the future, if the strain-induced metallic and insulating phases can be replicated at nanoscales using electromagnetic radiation, explained Lookman.

The research was funded by DOE's Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program. LDRD funds basic and applied research and development focusing on employee-initiated creative proposals selected at the discretion of the Laboratory Director.

Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy and works in partnership with NNSA's Sandia and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories to support NNSA in its mission.

Los Alamos enhances global security by ensuring the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent, developing technologies to reduce threats from weapons of mass destruction, and solving problems related to defense, energy, environment, infrastructure, health and national security concerns.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Los Alamos National Laboratory. "Scientists Provide New Understanding Of Manganites." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 June 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/06/040609070604.htm>.
Los Alamos National Laboratory. (2004, June 14). Scientists Provide New Understanding Of Manganites. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/06/040609070604.htm
Los Alamos National Laboratory. "Scientists Provide New Understanding Of Manganites." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/06/040609070604.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Will New A350 Help Airbus Fly?

Will New A350 Help Airbus Fly?

Reuters - Business Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Qatar Airways takes first delivery of Airbus' new A350 passenger jet. As Joel Flynn reports it's the planemaker's response to the Boeing 787 Dreamliner and the culmination of eight years of development. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Man Parachutes Off Lawn Chair Airlifted By Helium Balloons

Man Parachutes Off Lawn Chair Airlifted By Helium Balloons

Buzz60 (Dec. 22, 2014) A BASE jumper rides a lawn chair, a shotgun, and a giant bunch of helium balloons into the sky in what seems like a country version of the movie 'Up." Jen Markham has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A team of scientists led by Danish chemist Jorn Christensen says they have isolated two chemical compounds within an existing antipsychotic medication that could be used to help a range of failing antibiotics work against killer bacterial infections, such as Tuberculosis. Jim Drury went to meet him. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins