Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Genetic Modification In Mice Lowers Cholesterol And Homocysteine By Half

Date:
June 14, 2004
Source:
Federation Of American Societies For Experimental Biology
Summary:
Canadian scientists report that mice genetically altered so as to lack either of the two different pathways through which humans, mice, and other animals provide lipids for high density and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) did not appear to suffer any ill effects.

Canadian scientists report that mice genetically altered so as to lack either of the two different pathways through which humans, mice, and other animals provide lipids for high density and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) did not appear to suffer any ill effects. But animals from both groups had markedly lower levels of cholesterol in their blood stream. Alteration of one of the pathways also lowered blood levels of homocysteine by 50 percent.

Related Articles


Speaking June 13, at the annual meeting of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)/ 8th International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Conference (IUBMB) in Boston, Dr. Dennis Vance said the results suggest an unique therapeutic approach to lowering LDL cholesterol and homocysteine levels, both known risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Dr. Vance is Canada Research Chair in Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids. A leader in the biochemistry of lipids, he has spent his career understanding how the body regulates the manufacture of certain lipids and their functions in the human body. The new study reported at ASBMB focuses on the two methods or pathways by which the liver makes phosphatidylcholine (PC), the key building block of cell membranes in humans and other animals - and an important component of the HDL and LDL lipoproteins that carry fat and cholesterol in the blood stream.

The CT pathway contributes about 70 percent of the PC in the liver and the PEMT pathway contributes the other 30 percent. When the researchers genetically altered the mice so that their livers lacked either the CT or the PEMT pathway, the mice appeared normal and bred normally. But in each case, whether the CT or the PEMT pathway was missing, levels of lipoproteins were decreased by as much as half.

This suggests, said Dr. Vance, that pharmacological inhibition of the manufacture of PC in the liver might be a useful approach to lower LDL in the blood stream. The animals altered genetically so as not to have a PEMT pathway for the creation of PC also had a 50 percent decrease in homocysteine in the blood. Again, says Dr. Vance, pharmacological inhibition of PEMT might lower the levels of homocysteine in blood, thus lowering risk and incidence of cardiovascular disease.

In addition to Dr. Vance, other researchers in the study are Dr. Zhaoyu Li, Dr. Rene Jacobs, Dr. Luis Agellon, Dr. Yang Zhao, from the University of Alberta in Edmonton; Dr. Cecilia Devlin and Dr. Ira Tabas from the Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York; and Dr. John Brosnan, Dr. Lori Stead, and Dr. Margaret Brosnan, from Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Funding for the work came from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the National Institutes of Health (USA), the Canadian Foundation for Innovation, and the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research.

The presentation is part of an ASBMB session on molecular and cellular biology of lipids chaired by Dr. Vance.

###

With more than 11,900 members, the American Society of Biochemist and Molecular Biology is a nonprofit scientific and education organization dedicated to promoting understanding of the molecular nature of life processes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation Of American Societies For Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Federation Of American Societies For Experimental Biology. "Genetic Modification In Mice Lowers Cholesterol And Homocysteine By Half." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 June 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/06/040614075855.htm>.
Federation Of American Societies For Experimental Biology. (2004, June 14). Genetic Modification In Mice Lowers Cholesterol And Homocysteine By Half. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/06/040614075855.htm
Federation Of American Societies For Experimental Biology. "Genetic Modification In Mice Lowers Cholesterol And Homocysteine By Half." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/06/040614075855.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

AFP (Nov. 24, 2014) — Madagascar said Monday it is trying to contain an outbreak of plague -- similar to the Black Death that swept Medieval Europe -- that has killed 40 people and is spreading to the capital Antananarivo. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) — A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins