Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Team Of Microbiologists Develops Mutated Yeast Strains To Aid Geneticists

Date:
July 12, 2004
Source:
University Of Toronto
Summary:
University of Toronto microbiologists have used pattern recognition software to discover the function of yeast genes essential to cell life – knowledge that could help scientists determine what causes cells to die, as well as what they need to live.

Yeast cells treated with doxycyline.
Credit: Image Timothy Hughes

University of Toronto microbiologists have used pattern recognition software to discover the function of yeast genes essential to cell life – knowledge that could help scientists determine what causes cells to die, as well as what they need to live.

"Given the similarities between the yeast and human genomes, our work should promote advances in genomics research in both yeast and humans," said Professor Timothy Hughes of U of T's Department of Medical Genetics and Microbiology, who led the research team.

A paper published in the July 9 issue of the journal Cell describes how the researchers engineered mutations to 700 of the 1,000 yeast genes that are essential to cell life. They analyzed the mutant strains by making several basic measurements -- cell size, cell shape and gene levels – and by evaluating a cell's potential to grow in a variety of media. They then took these data and did computerized analysis of entire categories of genes in order to predict the functions of individual genes, applying a standard technique for pattern discovery used in fields ranging from marketing to face recognition.

"It's similar to ordering a book from Amazon.com," said Hughes. "After you've placed an order, they use the information they've gathered to predict your likes and dislikes. The next time you log onto the computer, they extrapolate and suggest other books you might enjoy. They also could use the data to predict other things – for example, your age and your gender – which might, on the surface, seem unrelated to books."

"We're hoping our use of this technique to predict the function of yeast genes is going to become a classical example of how to do this in biology."

To create each mutated strain, the researchers used a technique in which adding the drug doxycycline to the yeast cells disables an individual gene. This technique is a reliable alternative to the more common method of causing mutations by radiation, because the mutations are engineered rather than random.

The 700 yeast strains developed by Hughes' team are now available commercially to other researchers and 300 more strains are under development. Yeast is a staple of genomic research because many human genes are similar to yeast genes.

This research was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and Genome Canada.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Toronto. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Toronto. "Team Of Microbiologists Develops Mutated Yeast Strains To Aid Geneticists." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 July 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/07/040709085228.htm>.
University Of Toronto. (2004, July 12). Team Of Microbiologists Develops Mutated Yeast Strains To Aid Geneticists. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/07/040709085228.htm
University Of Toronto. "Team Of Microbiologists Develops Mutated Yeast Strains To Aid Geneticists." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/07/040709085228.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die

Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die

AP (July 22, 2014) An 80-year-old agave plant, which is blooming for the first and only time at a University of Michigan conservatory, will die when it's done (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
San Diego Zoo Welcomes New, Rare Rhino Calf

San Diego Zoo Welcomes New, Rare Rhino Calf

Reuters - US Online Video (July 21, 2014) An endangered black rhino baby is the newest resident at the San Diego Zoo. Sasha Salama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shark Sightings a Big Catch for Cape Tourism

Shark Sightings a Big Catch for Cape Tourism

AP (July 21, 2014) A rise in shark sightings along the shores of Chatham, Massachusetts is driving a surge of eager vacationers to the beach town looking to catch a glimpse of a great white. (July 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

$23.6 Billion Awarded To Widow In Smoking Lawsuit

Newsy (July 20, 2014) Cynthia Robinson claims R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company hid the health and addiction risks of its products, leading to the death of her husband in 1996. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins