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Hepatitis C: Surprise Finding Could Lead To Vaccine

Date:
August 25, 2004
Source:
University Of New South Wales
Summary:
New research from the University of New South Wales shows some people may repeatedly be able to clear hepatitis C virus from their bodies, without any biological traces of the potentially serious infection.

New research from the University of New South Wales shows some people may repeatedly be able to clear hepatitis C virus from their bodies, without any biological traces of the potentially serious infection.

The surprise finding could lead to the development of a vaccine against the virus, which currently affects around 210,000 Australians and can cause liver cancer and liver failure. The research has just been published in the prestigious Journal of Infectious Diseases.

The study found some individuals with high-risk behaviour, involving blood-to-blood contact, appear to develop "protective immunity" against the virus, thereby becoming resistant to persistent infection.

The researchers identified 160 prisoners who were free of the infection and tracked them on a monthly basis whilst in gaol. This entailed blood collection and recording episodes likely to put the prisoners at risk for transmission of hepatitis C, such as injecting drug use or tattooing.

Over the course of the study, four prisoners became infected with hepatitis C, yet they all went on to clear the virus without suffering any symptoms or developing antibodies against the virus. Instead it appeared that another arm of the immune system based on specialised white blood cells, or T cells, might be active in fighting the virus.

"It is possible that they had been infected in the past, perhaps on several occasions and that may be why they were able to clear the virus efficiently and without developing antibodies," said UNSW Professor Andrew Lloyd, who is in the School of Medical Sciences.

This cellular immunity appears similar to that found in some Kenyan prostitutes who appear to have protective immunity from HIV. These prostitutes are resistant to becoming HIV positive, despite repeatedly having unprotected sex with clients who are infected.

The researchers have found a similar pattern of cellular immunity to hepatitis C in another high-risk group - injecting drug users. They ultimately hope to reproduce a similar pattern of protective immunity with a synthetic vaccine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of New South Wales. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of New South Wales. "Hepatitis C: Surprise Finding Could Lead To Vaccine." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 August 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/08/040825094845.htm>.
University Of New South Wales. (2004, August 25). Hepatitis C: Surprise Finding Could Lead To Vaccine. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/08/040825094845.htm
University Of New South Wales. "Hepatitis C: Surprise Finding Could Lead To Vaccine." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/08/040825094845.htm (accessed August 28, 2014).

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