Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Superfluid Helium-4 Whistles Just The Right Tune

Date:
January 30, 2005
Source:
University Of California, Berkeley
Summary:
University of California, Berkeley, physicists can now tune in to and hear normally inaudible quantum vibrations, called quantum whistles, enabling them to build very sensitive detectors of rotation or very precise gyroscopes.

BERKELEY -- University of California, Berkeley, physicists can now tune in to and hear normally inaudible quantum vibrations, called quantum whistles, enabling them to build very sensitive detectors of rotation or very precise gyroscopes.

A quantum whistle is a peculiar characteristic of supercold condensed fluids, in this case superfluid helium-4, which vibrate when you try to push them through a tiny hole. Richard Packard, professor of physics at UC Berkeley, and graduate student Emile Hoskinson knew that many other researchers had failed to produce a quantum whistle by pushing helium-4 through a tiny aperture, which must be no bigger than a few tens of nanometers across - the size of the smallest viruses and about 1,000 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair.

To their surprise, however, a chorus of thousands of nano-whistles produced a wail loud enough to hear. This is the first demonstration of whistling in superfluid helium-4. According to Packard and Hoskinson, the purity of the tone may lead to the development of rotation sensors that are sufficiently sensitive to be used for Earth science, seismology and inertial navigation.

"You could measure rotational signals from an earthquake or build more precise gyroscopes for submarines," Packard speculated.

Four years ago, Packard and his coworkers built and successfully tested a gyroscope based on quantum whistling in superfluid helium-3. But that required cooling the device to a few thousandths of a degree above absolute zero, a highly specialized and time-consuming process. Because the new phenomenon exists at 2 Kelvin - a temperature achievable with off-the-shelf cryo-coolers - the proposed sensors also will be user-friendly to scientists unfamiliar with cryogenic technology. A temperature of 2 Kelvin is the equivalent of minus 456 degrees Fahrenheit.

"Because these oscillations appear in helium-4 at a temperature 2,000 times higher than in superfluid helium-3, it may be possible to build sensitive rotation sensors using much simpler technology than previously believed," the researchers wrote in a brief communication appearing in the Jan 27 issue of the journal Nature.

Packard noted that sensitive rotation or spin detectors could have application in numerous fields, from geodesy, which charts changes in the spin and wobble of the Earth, to navigation, where gyroscopes are used to guide ships. Though little is now know about the rotational signals from earthquakes, having a sensitive rotation detector might reveal new and interesting phenomena.

Quantum whistling is analogous to a phenomenon in another macroscopic quantum system, a superconductor, which develops an oscillating current when a voltage is applied across a non-conducting gap. Nobel Laureates Philip Anderson, Brian Josephson and Richard Feynman predicted in 1962 that the same would happen in superfluids. In the case of superfluids, however, a pressure difference across a tiny hole would cause a vibration in the superfluid at a frequency - the Josephson frequency - that increases as the pressure increases. The fact that the fluid oscillates back and forth through the hole rather than flows from the high-pressure side to the low-pressure side, as a normal liquid would, is one of the many weird aspects of quantum systems like superfluids.

Eight years ago, Packard and fellow UC Berkeley physicist Seamus Davis, now at Cornell University, heard such vibrations when pushing superfluid helium-3 through a similar array of 4,225 holes, each 100 nanometers across. Though no simple feat - it took them 10 years to make their experiment whistle, working at one thousandth of a degree Kelvin - it's theoretically easier than with helium-4.

For helium-4 to whistle, physicists predicted that the holes either had to be much smaller, pushing the limits of today's technology, or the temperature had to be within a few hundred thousandths of a degree of the temperature at which helium-4 becomes a superfluid, that is, 2 Kelvin. While working with an array of holes 70 nanometers across, essentially testing the apparatus with helium-4 before using it to conduct a helium-3 experiment, Hoskinson was surprised when he put on earphones and heard the characteristic pennywhistle sound as the pitch dropped with the pressure in the device.

"Predictions on where the Josephson oscillations would occur put them much closer to the transition temperature than I could hope to go," Hoskinson said. "The fact that I could detect the oscillations with the set-up I had was amazing in itself, and something we're very interested in exploring."

He and Packard calculated that the tones were due to a different mechanism, phase slippage, than that producing the whistle in helium-3, though it follows the same relationship between frequency and driving pressure. Phase slippage shouldn't have produced a pure tone at all. The vibrations at the holes should shift randomly and get lost in the noise. Even if phase slippage did produce a constant tone in a single hole, the whistles from the array of 4,225 holes should have been out of phase and the resulting sound less than 100 times louder than that from a single hole.

Apparently, Packard said, the vibrating holes somehow achieved synchrony, like crickets chirping in unison on a summer evening, amplifying the sound 4,000 times higher - loud enough to be heard above the background noise of the experiment.

"For 40 years, people have been trying to see something like this, but it has always been with single apertures," Hoskinson said. "Maybe it's true that you don't get coherent oscillations with a single aperture, but somehow, with an array of apertures, the noise is suppressed and you hear a coherent whistle."

"There was no reason to expect that. I still think it's amazing," Packard added.

The research by Packard, Hoskinson and post-doctoral fellow Thomas Haard is supported by the National Science Foundation and by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of California, Berkeley. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of California, Berkeley. "Superfluid Helium-4 Whistles Just The Right Tune." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 January 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050128214229.htm>.
University Of California, Berkeley. (2005, January 30). Superfluid Helium-4 Whistles Just The Right Tune. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050128214229.htm
University Of California, Berkeley. "Superfluid Helium-4 Whistles Just The Right Tune." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050128214229.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Space Race Pits Bezos Vs Musk

Space Race Pits Bezos Vs Musk

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 16, 2014) Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' startup will team up with Boeing and Lockheed to develop rocket engines as Elon Musk races to have his rockets certified. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
MIT's Robot Cheetah Unleashed — Can Now Run, Jump Freely

MIT's Robot Cheetah Unleashed — Can Now Run, Jump Freely

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) MIT developed a robot modeled after a cheetah. It can run up to speeds of 10 mph, though researchers estimate it will eventually reach 30 mph. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Manufacturer Prints 3-D Car In Record Time

Manufacturer Prints 3-D Car In Record Time

Newsy (Sep. 15, 2014) Automobile manufacturer Local Motors created a drivable electric car using a 3-D printer. Printing the body only took 44 hours. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Refurbished New York Subway Tunnel Unveiled After Sandy Damage

Refurbished New York Subway Tunnel Unveiled After Sandy Damage

Reuters - US Online Video (Sep. 15, 2014) New York officials unveil subway tunnels that were refurbished after Superstorm Sandy. Nathan Frandino reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins