Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Rush Physicians Using Gene Therapy For Heart Patients With Moderate To Severe Chest Pains Who Do Not Benefit From Other Treatments

Date:
February 8, 2005
Source:
Rush University Medical Center
Summary:
Individuals with moderate to severe chest pains (angina) who have not found relief from medication may benefit from a new gene therapy approach being used by cardiologists at Rush University Medical Center to grow new blood vessels in the heart.

Individuals with moderate to severe chest pains (angina) who have not found relief from medication may benefit from a new gene therapy approach being used by cardiologists at Rush University Medical Center to grow new blood vessels in the heart.

Related Articles


The phase II clinical research study uses vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (VEGF-2) in the form of a solution containing a DNA plasmid that is delivered using catheterization to heart tissue that has been damaged from insufficient blood flow.

Once the catheter reaches the targeted site inside of the heart, the VEGF-2 is injected into the heart muscle region with inadequate blood supply. The DNA plasmid is then taken up by the middle muscular layer of the heart wall near the injection site. Inside the cell, the DNA encoded VEGF-2 expresses itself which in turn stimulates the growth of new blood vessels by promoting the proliferation of endothelial cells in the heart.

New blood vessels are required to provide oxygen-carrying blood to heart muscles to compensate for the blocked heart arteries. The subsequent, improved blood flow relieves the painful symptoms of angina.

"The process of growing new blood vessels, or angiogenesis, should occur over the course of four to eight weeks following the procedure which is done in the cardiac catheterization lab at Rush," said Dr. Gary L. Schaer, the principal investigator of the trial at Rush and director of the Rush Cardiac Catheterization Labs. "The patient goes home the next day." Several patients have received the gene therapy and all are doing well.

Individuals who may be candidates for this gene therapy study trial must have moderate to severe angina, but cannot also be candidates for treatment using angioplasty or bypass surgery. Angioplasty involves a catheterization with a balloon-like device that opens blocked arteries, while bypass surgery requires open-heart surgery to place veins removed from the patient's leg or arteries taken from the patient's chest wall or arm to "bypass" the blocked blood vessels.

While both of these treatments have been shown to be successful in relieving severe chest pains resulting from blocked arteries, a significant percentage of patients eventually do not respond well to either treatment, often requiring another angioplasty or bypass operation, noted Schaer. "If gene therapy proves to be safe and effective, it will represent an important new approach to improve the quality of life in these seriously ill patients with refractory chest pain," said Dr. R. Jeffrey Snell, study co-investigator and Schaer's colleague at Rush.

In the new study, patients will be randomly assigned to receive the gene administered through a cardiac catheter threaded into the heart from a leg artery or a placebo delivered using the same method. As required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the study is "double blinded," which means that neither the doctor nor the patient will know whether he or she is receiving the gene therapy or a placebo. For every three patients that receive the active gene, one will receive a placebo. Following treatment, patients enrolled in the study will be examined for chest pain at one month, three months and six months. A total of 404 patients will be enrolled in the study at the 20 study sites across the country.

The Genetic Angiogenic Stimulation Investigational Study (GENASIS) is funded by Corautus Genetics.

More than 11 million people in the United States suffer from coronary artery disease. Many patients receive medications to increase blood flow but nearly 500,000 angioplasties and coronary bypass procedures are performed each year in those patients who do not benefit from medication.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Rush University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Rush University Medical Center. "Rush Physicians Using Gene Therapy For Heart Patients With Moderate To Severe Chest Pains Who Do Not Benefit From Other Treatments." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 February 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050205115737.htm>.
Rush University Medical Center. (2005, February 8). Rush Physicians Using Gene Therapy For Heart Patients With Moderate To Severe Chest Pains Who Do Not Benefit From Other Treatments. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050205115737.htm
Rush University Medical Center. "Rush Physicians Using Gene Therapy For Heart Patients With Moderate To Severe Chest Pains Who Do Not Benefit From Other Treatments." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/02/050205115737.htm (accessed March 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) A dongle that plugs into a Smartphone mimics a lab-based blood test for HIV and syphilis and can detect the diseases in 15 minutes, say researchers. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) An Italian doctor is saying he could stick someone&apos;s head onto someone else&apos;s body. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) reports. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

Newsy (Feb. 27, 2015) A new study from researchers at New York University suggests dentists could soon use blood samples taken from patients&apos; mouths to test for diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) If you&apos;re looking to boost your health this season, there are a few quick and easy steps to prompt you for success. Krystin Goodwin (@Krystingoodwin) has the best tips to give your health a makeover this spring! Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins