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Saliva Test May Spot Gum And Heart Disease

Date:
March 18, 2005
Source:
University Of Michigan
Summary:
A self-contained saliva test kit developed by a University of Michigan School of Dentistry professor in collaboration with government agencies and the private sector is now undergoing limited preliminary testing at two U-M sites.

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — A self-contained saliva test kit developed by a University of Michigan School of Dentistry professor in collaboration with government agencies and the private sector is now undergoing limited preliminary testing at two U-M sites.

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“For years, oral health care professionals have talked about a close connection between a person's saliva and his or her bloodstream,” said William Giannobile, a professor of dentistry and associate professor of biomedical engineering who developed the test kit. “There are a significant number of potential applications for this device because of its ease of use and its portability.”

The hand-held, battery-powered rapid-test kit is being used to test saliva samples from several dozen patients to determine if they have periodontal or cardiovascular disease biomarkers. Once marketed, the kit will allow dentists to test patients in their offices and learn, in 15 minutes or less, if their patients have those diseases. One day the kit may also be used by federal, state or local government agencies as well as corporations to detect biological toxins.

Giannobile, who is also the director of the Michigan Center for Oral Health Research (MCOHR), said that the kit has been used to analyze saliva samples from nearly 30 individuals who have participated in a pilot study that began in December 2004 at the School of Dentistry. Before the end of this year, saliva samples will be collected from another 100 individuals at MCOHR clinics in northeast Ann Arbor.

“The tests we are now conducting using this kit may determine just how much of a link there is between a person's saliva and their blood, and how it may be affecting their overall health,” Giannobile said. The preliminary testing now underway will help determine which biological markers indicate the presence of periodontal disease and osteoporosis as well as detect the presence of C-reactive protein, a cardiovascular disease marker.

It may be several years before the kit is available for widespread use, however. “After the last of the patients are tested in December, we will analyze the results and conduct follow-up examinations of all 130 patients for a year to see if there is a correlation between their oral health and the test results,” Giannobile said.

Collaborating with Giannobile are Dr. Charles Hasselbrink and Dr. Mark Burns, both with the U-M School of Chemical Engineering. Funding for the test studies is being provided by the National Institutes of Health.

Manufactured by Sandia National Laboratories, The Microchem LabTM is designed to eliminate the need for dentists to send a patient's saliva sample to a laboratory. Sandia has major research and developmental interests in national security, energy, and environmental technologies.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Michigan. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Michigan. "Saliva Test May Spot Gum And Heart Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 March 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050309115430.htm>.
University Of Michigan. (2005, March 18). Saliva Test May Spot Gum And Heart Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050309115430.htm
University Of Michigan. "Saliva Test May Spot Gum And Heart Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/03/050309115430.htm (accessed November 22, 2014).

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