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Cell (biology)

The cell is the structural and functional unit of all living organisms, and is sometimes called the "building block of life." Some organisms, such as bacteria, are unicellular, consisting of a single cell.

Other organisms, such as humans, are multicellular, (humans have an estimated 100 trillion cells; a typical cell size is 10 µm, a typical cell mass 1 nanogram).

The largest known cell is an ostrich egg.

Each cell is at least somewhat self-contained and self-maintaining: it can take in nutrients, convert these nutrients into energy, carry out specialized functions, and reproduce as necessary.

Each cell stores its own set of instructions for carrying out each of these activities.

There are two types of cells, eukaryotic and prokaryotic.

Prokaryotic cells are usually singletons, while eukaryotic cells are usually found in multi-cellular organisms.

Note:   The above text is excerpted from the Wikipedia article "Cell (biology)", which has been released under the GNU Free Documentation License.
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July 31, 2015

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