Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Inner Structure Of Cells Behaves Much As Molten Glass

Date:
June 22, 2005
Source:
Harvard School Of Public Health
Summary:
An international team led by Jeffrey J. Fredberg, professor of bioengineering and physiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, has found that the cell modulates its mechanical properties in much the same way as a glassblower shapes fine glassware. This new view of cellular functions sheds light on mechanical facets of phenomena as diverse as asthma, cancer, inflammation, and vascular disease.

Boston, MA - An international team led by Jeffrey J. Fredberg, professor of bioengineering and physiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, has found that the cell modulates its mechanical properties in much the same way as a glassblower shapes fine glassware. This new view of cellular functions sheds light on mechanical facets of phenomena as diverse as asthma, cancer, inflammation, and vascular disease. These findings appear in advance online from the July, 2005 issue of Nature Materials.

Related Articles


To fashion a work of glass, a glassblower must heat the object, shape it, and then cool it down. Fredberg and his colleagues have shown that the cell modulates its mechanical properties and changes its malleability in much the same way. But instead of changing temperature, the cell changes a temperature-like property that has much the same effect.

Using an array of novel nanotechnologies developed by the researchers at HSPH, Fredberg et al. discovered the basic physical laws that describe cell mechanical behavior. Previously, the classical model of cell mechanical behavior had pictured the cell as a viscous fluid core contained by an elastic cortical membrane, but their findings did not at all conform to that picture. The team's experiments show that the cell is a strange intermediate form of matter that is neither solid nor fluid, but retains features of both. Moreover, as the cell goes about its routine business of stretching, spreading, and contracting, it can vary that temperature-like property and control where it sits along the spectrum between solid-like and fluid-like states.

"These findings have important lessons for understanding the dynamics of structural proteins at a scale that is intermediate between the single molecule and integrative cellular function. This is a collective phenomenon of many molecules interacting in concert, and would disappear altogether in the study of one molecule interacting with another in isolation," said Fredberg. He continued, "The laws governing cell behavior bring together into one physical picture cell elasticity, viscosity, and remodeling, and give us a different way to think about the molecular basis of airway narrowing in asthma, vessel narrowing in vascular disease, wound repair, embryonic development, and cell invasion in cancer, all of which have important mechanical components. Perhaps most surprising of all, in addition to offering a different way to think about mechanisms of disease, these findings shed light upon the behavior of familiar inert condensed substances that remain poorly understood, including pastes, foams, emulsions, and granular materials."

The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Harvard School Of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Harvard School Of Public Health. "Inner Structure Of Cells Behaves Much As Molten Glass." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 June 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050621100923.htm>.
Harvard School Of Public Health. (2005, June 22). Inner Structure Of Cells Behaves Much As Molten Glass. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050621100923.htm
Harvard School Of Public Health. "Inner Structure Of Cells Behaves Much As Molten Glass." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050621100923.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Monday, November 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Car Park Solution for Flexible Green Energy

Car Park Solution for Flexible Green Energy

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 24, 2014) A British solar power start-up says that by covering millions of existing car park spaces around the UK with flexible solar panels, the country's power problems could be solved. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Microsoft Adds Robot Guards, Ushers In Sci-Fi Apocalypse

Microsoft Adds Robot Guards, Ushers In Sci-Fi Apocalypse

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Microsoft has robotic security guards working at its Silicon Valley Campus. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Toyota's Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Green Car Soon Available in the US

Toyota's Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Green Car Soon Available in the US

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Toyota presented its hydrogen fuel-cell compact car called "Mirai" to US consumers at the Los Angeles auto show. The car should go on sale in 2015 for around $60.000. It combines stored hydrogen with oxygen to generate its own power. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google Announces Improvements To Balloon-Borne Wi-Fi Project

Google Announces Improvements To Balloon-Borne Wi-Fi Project

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) In a blog post, Google said its balloons have traveled 3 million kilometers since the start of Project Loon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins