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System Drastically Cuts Down Botulism Detection Time

Date:
September 12, 2005
Source:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Summary:
One of the most lethal substances in the world – botulism – can be detected using special systems in about 20–25 minutes. Now, researchers at DOE’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory can detect its presence in five minutes, using the lab’s successful Biodetection Enabling Analyte Delivery System, or BEADS combined with optical detection.

A Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researcher demonstrates the Biodetection Enabling Analyte Delivery System combined with optical detection. The BEADS system has been commercially licensed to companies and can detect botulinum and multiple toxins, such as E. coli, salmonella, and ricin simultaneously.
Credit: Image courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Washington, D.C. – One of the most lethal substances in the world –botulism – can be detected using special systems in about 20–25minutes. Now, researchers at DOE’s Pacific Northwest NationalLaboratory can detect its presence in five minutes, using the lab’ssuccessful Biodetection Enabling Analyte Delivery System, or BEADScombined with optical detection.

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The detection system includes three critical components. First,BEADS isolates the toxin from environmental samples. Next, an antibodyis used to purify and concentrate the pathogen or toxin to enableaccurate and sensitive detection. Finally, a second antibody, called areporter antibody, labeled with a fluorescent dye or a fluorescentquantum dot binds to a different region on the toxin or pathogen. Thefluorescence of the quantum dot is measured on the bead and canquantify the concentration of the toxin.

The BEADS system has been commercially licensed to a few companies.In addition to detecting botulinum, the system can be tailored todetect multiple pathogens or toxins, such as E. coli, salmonella andricin, simultaneously.

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Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researcher Heather Edbergpresented her results at the 230th national meeting of the AmericanChemical Society, in Washington, D.C.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. "System Drastically Cuts Down Botulism Detection Time." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 September 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050911111223.htm>.
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. (2005, September 12). System Drastically Cuts Down Botulism Detection Time. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050911111223.htm
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. "System Drastically Cuts Down Botulism Detection Time." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050911111223.htm (accessed January 26, 2015).

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