Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Dust Storms May Carry Bacteria To Japan From China

Date:
October 20, 2005
Source:
BioMed Central
Summary:
Bacteria found in soil around Tokyo are not indigenous to the area. A study published in the open access journal Saline Systems reveals a large proportion of salt-loving bacteria in non-saline soil around Tokyo. The researchers suggest that dust storms may have carried the bacteria from their natural habitats in China.

Bacteria found in soil around Tokyo are not indigenous to the area. A study published in the open access journal Saline Systems reveals a large proportion of salt-loving bacteria in non-saline soil around Tokyo. The researchers suggest that dust storms may have carried the bacteria from their natural habitats in China.

Related Articles


Akinobu Echigo and colleagues, from Toyo University and the Noda Institute for Scientific Research in Japan, analysed bacteria found in non-saline soil collected in gardens, fields and roadways in the Tokyo area. From their soil samples, they isolated halophilic bacteria - bacteria that are able to survive in a high-salt environment - by growing the bacteria in a culture medium with a salt concentration of at least 20%.

Their results show that approximately 1 in 200,000 of the bacteria found in the soil samples were halophilic, and the bacteria came from at least seven different families.

Halophilic bacteria thrive in environments where the average concentration of salt is 3-15%. The salt concentration in the soil the authors analysed was 20 to 100 times lower than that, and it seems unlikely that the halophilic bacteria found in this soil originated there. Most of the halophilic bacteria were present in the soil as endospores: reproductive cells with a hard coat that protects them against adverse environmental conditions. Surprisingly, the same proportion of endospores was found in saline soil closer to the coast. The authors deduce from these findings that the endospores may have been carried to the Tokyo area by winds or dust storms, and possibly originated in salt lakes in Inner Mongolia in China.

This study adds to the evidence that dust storms in Asia can have implications in geographically remote countries. Previous studies have shown that dust storms in Northern China and Mongolia can cause myriad problems elsewhere, including respiratory problems, loss of livestock and crops and disruption of communication.

###

Article:
Endospores of halophilic bacteria of the family Bacillaceae isolated from non-saline Japanese soil may be transported by Kosa event (Asian dust storm)
Akinobu Echigo, Miki Hino, Tadamasa Fukushima, Toru Mizuki, Masahiro
Kamekura, and Ron Usami
Saline Systems, in press


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by BioMed Central. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

BioMed Central. "Dust Storms May Carry Bacteria To Japan From China." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 October 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051020091138.htm>.
BioMed Central. (2005, October 20). Dust Storms May Carry Bacteria To Japan From China. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051020091138.htm
BioMed Central. "Dust Storms May Carry Bacteria To Japan From China." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/10/051020091138.htm (accessed April 18, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Un-Bee-Lievable: Bees on the Loose After Washington Truck Crash

Un-Bee-Lievable: Bees on the Loose After Washington Truck Crash

Reuters - US Online Video (Apr. 17, 2015) A truck carrying honey bees overturns near Lynnwood, Washington, spreading boxes of live bees across the highway. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers found a spike in oxytocin occurs in both humans and dogs when they gaze into each other&apos;s eyes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dog Flu Spreading in Midwestern States

Dog Flu Spreading in Midwestern States

AP (Apr. 17, 2015) Dog flu is spreading in several Midwestern states. Dog daycare centers and veterinary offices are taking precautions. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Rare Whale Spotted in Gulf of Mexico

Raw: Rare Whale Spotted in Gulf of Mexico

AP (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers from the E/V Nautilus had quite a surprise Tuesday, when a curious sperm whale swam around their remotely operated vehicle in the Gulf of Mexico. Cameras captured the encounter. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins