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Peacetime Grenades Harm Environment

Date:
December 13, 2005
Source:
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Summary:
Elisabeth Hochschorner and colleagues from the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm showed that during peacetime, the mining of metals used in grenade construction and the energy costs needed to produce them cause significant environmental impact. The residues emitted during practice detonations also top the list of harmful effects.

The late Princess Diana's fears about abandoned munitions could be the least of our worries.

Scientists have assessed the overall impact of grenades and concluded that even during peacetime, stockpiling these munitions can cause significant environmental damage.

Elisabeth Hochschorner and colleagues from the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm showed that during peacetime, the mining of metals used in grenade construction and the energy costs needed to produce them cause significant environmental impact. The residues emitted during practice detonations also top the list of harmful effects.

In a wartime situation, mining the copper used to make the grenades damages the earth even more than harmful residues from explosions because the exploded copper cannot be recycled as it is during peacetime decommissioning. The authors suggest that replacing plastic for copper could make grenades greener.

The Swedish study used a method called 'life cycle assessment' (LCA) which has never been applied to munitions before (The Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, DOI 10.1002/jctb.0274).

Dr Steven Young, President of GreenhouseGasMeasurement.com, said the defense industry, one of the biggest industrial sectors, has embraced LCA studies in the past and is "very well positioned" to make progress on environmental issues. It tends to make analytical decisions and has huge purchasing power, he adds.

###

Article: Hochschorner et al. "Environmental life cycle assessment of a pre-fragmented high explosive grenade." The Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology. (DOI: 10.1002/jctb.1446). Published Online: December 13, 2005.

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About The Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology The Journal of the Chemical Technology and Biotechnology (JCTB) is an international peer-reviewed journal concerned with the application of scientific discoveries and advancements in chemical and biological technology that aim towards economically sustainable industrial production or are necessary for environmental protection. JCTB focuses on the interfaces between chemical technology and biotechnology, especially where these impact on health and safety and the environment.

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About John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., provides must- have content and services to customers worldwide. Our core businesses include scientific, technical, and medical journals, encyclopedias, books, and online products and services; professional and consumer books and subscription services; and educational materials for undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners. Wiley has publishing, marketing, and distribution centers in the United States, Canada, Europe, Asia, and Australia. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbols JWa and JWb. Wiley's Internet site can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.


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The above story is based on materials provided by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. "Peacetime Grenades Harm Environment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 December 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051213073052.htm>.
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. (2005, December 13). Peacetime Grenades Harm Environment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051213073052.htm
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. "Peacetime Grenades Harm Environment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051213073052.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

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