Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Heart Burn Medication A Risk Factor For Community-acquired C. Difficile

Date:
December 29, 2005
Source:
McGill University
Summary:
Researchers have discovered that drugs, such as heart burn medications, which reduce gastric acidity, are potential risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection outside of hospitals. The new research to be published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) tomorrow focuses on community-acquired C. difficile, and is a follow-up to previous work by the same group that demonstrated an increased risk from these medications in hospital settings.

Researchers have discovered that drugs, such as heart burn medications, which reduce gastric acidity, are potential risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection outside of hospitals. The new research to be published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) tomorrow focuses on community-acquired C. difficile, and is a follow-up to previous work by the same group that demonstrated an increased risk from these medications in hospital settings.

Related Articles


"We believe drugs that reduce gastric acidity provide a more hospitable environment within which C. difficile bacteria can colonize," says MUHC researcher and lead author of the new study Dr. Sandra Dial. Numerous studies worldwide have documented increases in hospital C. difficile associated disease, but this study is the first to suggest this trend is mirrored in the general community. Dr. Sandra Dial is Attending Staff in the Department of Critical Care at both the MUHC and Jewish General Hospital (JGH) and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at McGill University.

Using data from the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database (GPRD), researchers traced variation in community C. difficile associated disease over a 10-year period. "In 1994 there was less than one C. difficile case per 100,000 people in the database," says Dr. Dial. "By 2004, this number had increased exponentially to 22 cases to per 100,000." It is important to note however, that community rates are still much lower than hospitals overall.

A surprising discovery in the study was that over 70% of the patients who developed C. difficile associated disease had not been admitted to hospital in the past year, and that less than 50% had taken antibiotics in the three months prior to developing disease. "This is noteworthy because unlike previous beliefs it is now evident that C. difficile disease has left the hospital setting to reach the community and that antibiotics are not the only culprit," says senior author of the study Dr. Samy Suissa, Director of the Division of Clinical Epidemiology at the MUHC and James McGill Professor of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Medicine at McGill University.

This discovery follows on the heels of an announcement last week that researchers from the MUHC and JGH have sequenced the Quebec strain of C. difficile. McGill and its affiliated hospitals will continue to take a leading role in C. difficile research in order to improve treatments and prevention techniques, as well as develop more rapid diagnosis for an infection that has become a serious health concern, not just in Quebec but around the world.

###

This research was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) and the Fonds de la recherch้ en sant้ du Qu้bec (FRSQ). Dr Suissa is the recipient of a Distinguished Scientist award from the CIHR.

About Clostridium difficile
Clostridium difficile, also known as C. difficile, is a bacterial microbe that can cause an infection of the bowel. The usual symptoms are diarrhea, fever and abdominal pain. Quebec-based research indicates that the most common C. difficile strain in Quebec is similar to others found in the US and Europe. The Quebec strain is resistant to a group of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones, which may have contributed to its spread through the province. Regular hand washing with soap and water is the mainstay of prevention of C. difficile infection.

About the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC)
The MUHC is a comprehensive academic health institution with an international reputation for excellence in clinical programs, research and teaching. The MUHC is a merger of five teaching hospitals affiliated with the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University, the Montreal Children's, Montreal General, Royal Victoria, and Montreal Neurological Hospitals, as well as the Montreal Chest Institute. Building on the tradition of medical leadership of the founding hospitals, the goal of the MUHC is to provide patient care based on the most advanced knowledge in the health care field, and to contribute to the development of new knowledge.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by McGill University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

McGill University. "Heart Burn Medication A Risk Factor For Community-acquired C. Difficile." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 December 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051229113544.htm>.
McGill University. (2005, December 29). Heart Burn Medication A Risk Factor For Community-acquired C. Difficile. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051229113544.htm
McGill University. "Heart Burn Medication A Risk Factor For Community-acquired C. Difficile." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/12/051229113544.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) — It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) — More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) — In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) — The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins