Science News
from research organizations

Male Praying Mantids Prefer Not To Be Victims Of Sexual Cannibalism

Date:
July 27, 2006
Source:
University of Chicago Press Journals
Summary:
Female praying mantids are notorious for sexual cannibalism -- that is, for eating their male partner during mating. However, the possibility that males may have something to gain from this violent act has never been resolved experimentally. In the August issue of The American Naturalist, Jonathan Lelito and William Brown (SUNY-Fredonia), study male risk-taking behavior in a praying mantis. They find that the males are able to assess the risk of cannibalism and become more cautious in the presence of particularly hungry females.
Share:
       
FULL STORY

Hungry female praying mantids are more likely to cannibalize.
Credit: Michael Maxwell

Female praying mantids are notorious for sexual cannibalism – that is, for eating their male partner during mating. However, the possibility that males may also have something to gain from this violent act has never been resolved experimentally.

In a paper in the August issue of The American Naturalist, Jonathan Lelito and William Brown (SUNY-Fredonia), study male risk-taking behavior in a praying mantis by altering the risk of cannibalism and observing changes in male behavior. They find that the males are able to assess the risk of cannibalism and become more cautious in the presence of particularly hungry females.

"We know that hungry females are more likely to cannibalize and a head-on orientation makes it easier for her to attack the male with her predatory front legs," says Brown.

Lelito and Brown thus varied female hunger and physical orientation in order to assess how male mantids respond to variation in the risk of cannibalism. They found that males responded to greater risk by slowing their approach, increasing courtship behavior, and mounting from a greater – and possibly safer – distance.

"This shows that male mantids actively assess variation in risk and change their behavior to reduce the chance of being cannibalized," explains Brown. "Males are clearly not complicit, and the act of sexual cannibalism in praying mantids is an example of extreme conflict between the sexes."

Founded in 1867, The American Naturalist is one of the world's most renowned, peer-reviewed publications in ecology, evolution, and population and integrative biology research. AN emphasizes sophisticated methodologies and innovative theoretical syntheses--all in an effort to advance the knowledge of organic evolution and other broad biological principles.

Jonathan P. Lelito and William D. Brown, "Complicity or conflict over sexual cannibalism? Male risk taking in the praying mantis Tenodera aridifolia sinensis." The American Naturalist 167:263


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University of Chicago Press Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Chicago Press Journals. "Male Praying Mantids Prefer Not To Be Victims Of Sexual Cannibalism." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 July 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/07/060726183753.htm>.
University of Chicago Press Journals. (2006, July 27). Male Praying Mantids Prefer Not To Be Victims Of Sexual Cannibalism. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/07/060726183753.htm
University of Chicago Press Journals. "Male Praying Mantids Prefer Not To Be Victims Of Sexual Cannibalism." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/07/060726183753.htm (accessed July 31, 2015).

Share This Page: