Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Electromagnetic Miniatures

Date:
October 9, 2006
Source:
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Summary:
G. M. Whitesides and co-workers (Harvard University) have developed an uncomplicated method for producing a microfluidic channel along with two metal cables parallel to it and only 10 m away. Application of an electrical field generates magnetic fields of up to 2.8 mT within this channel. Antibodies that bind to surface structures of cells can be coupled to magnetic beads and can be fished out of a mixture with an electromagnet.

Magnetic components that can be controlled by the application of an external electric field are useful in many different applications. They can serve as microfluidic pumps, mixers, or valves in miniature lab-on-chip systems, or they can help in sorting and arranging magnetic particles.

Related Articles


Biochemistry and cellular biology in particular benefit from many possible uses: for example, antibodies or other ligands that bind to individual biomolecules or to surface structures of cells can be coupled to magnetic beads in order to recognize and bind to their specific bonding partner even in complex mixtures. They can subsequently be fished out of the mixture with an electromagnet. Electromagnets have an additional advantage over permanent magnets: they can easily be switched on and off with an electric current. Also, the field strength can be adjusted to the desired value and can be changed as required. However, electromagnets do have the disadvantage of generating weaker magnetic fields, meaning that they must be very close to the place where they are to be used.

G. M. Whitesides and his co-workers at Harvard University in Cambridge, USA, have now developed an uncomplicated method for producing a microfluidic channel along with two metal cables parallel to it and only 10 m away.

First, a structure consisting of a 40-m-wide and 40-m-deep inner channel between two 120-m-wide and 40-m-deep outer channels was lithographically engraved into a polydimethylsiloxane resin. Treatment with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane silanized the surfaces of the outer channels. This allowed them to be coated with molten solder that was poured into the heated forms in the next step. Upon cooling, the liquid metal solidified, forming two stable metal cables to the left and right of the inner channel. Application of an electrical field to these two wires generates magnetic fields of up to 2.8 mT within the central channel.

It was also possible to steer magnetic spheres through the channel: the scientists again made a channel with parallel wires on either side, but this time the channel forked after a few millimeters. A suspension of magnetic spheres flowed through the channel. If current was allowed to flow through wire on the right, the spheres flowed to the right as they reached the fork, and vice versa.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. "Electromagnetic Miniatures." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 October 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061007111446.htm>.
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. (2006, October 9). Electromagnetic Miniatures. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061007111446.htm
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. "Electromagnetic Miniatures." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061007111446.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Friday, March 6, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Gas Production Cut on Earthquake Fears

Gas Production Cut on Earthquake Fears

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) The Dutch government has cut production at Europe&apos;s largest gas field in Groningen amid concerns over earthquakes which are damaging local churches. As Amy Pollock reports the decision - largely politically-motivated - could have big economic conseqeunces. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Star Wars-Inspired Prototype Creates Holographic Display

Star Wars-Inspired Prototype Creates Holographic Display

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) A prototype holographic display named Leia - after the Star Wars princess who appeared in holographic form asking Obi-Wan Kenobu for help - is demonstrated at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
IKEA and Samsung Launch Embedded Wireless Charging Range

IKEA and Samsung Launch Embedded Wireless Charging Range

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Samsung and IKEA hope their new embedded wireless charging products, launched at Barcelona&apos;s Mobile World Congress, will tempt consumers eager for plugless power. Jim Drury reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Samsung Unveils $30,000 'Dream Doghouse'

Samsung Unveils $30,000 'Dream Doghouse'

Buzz60 (Mar. 5, 2015) On display at the Crufts dog show in England, the &apos;dog kennel of the future&apos; comes with features like a doggie treadmill and Samsung tablet. Mike Janela (@mikejanela) has more. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins