Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Drug Combo Improves Survival In Patients With COPD

Date:
October 25, 2006
Source:
American College of Chest Physicians
Summary:
A combination of inhaled salmeterol and fluticasone propionate may reduced the risk of death in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, shows new research presented at CHEST 2006, the 72nd annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians.

A combination of two common medications may help patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) live longer. New research presented at CHEST 2006, the 72nd annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), shows that when used in combination, inhaled salmeterol (SAL) and fluticasone propionate (FP) reduced the risk of dying by up to 17.5 percent in patients with COPD. Currently, FP, an inhaled corticosteroid, and SAL, a long-acting B2-agonist bronchodilator, are used alone and in combination to treat both asthma and COPD.

"The combination therapy of salmeterol and fluticasone is the first intervention since oxygen therapy or smoking cessation to show improved survival in patients with COPD," said study author Bartolome R. Celli, MD, FCCP, of Caritas-St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, Boston, MA. "The improvement was comparable with that produced by statins in cardiovascular mortality. This represents an important step forward in the management of COPD."

As part of the TOwards a Revolution in COPD Health (TORCH) study, researchers from the United Kingdom, Denmark, Australia, and the United States investigated whether the combined therapy of salmeterol and fluticasone (FSC) would significantly impact survival in patients with COPD. Patients (n=6,112) with moderate to severe COPD from 42 countries were included in the 3-year, double-blind trial. Of the patients (76 percent men, mean age 65 years), 1,534 received FP; 1,521 received SAL; 1,533 received FSC; and the remaining patients received a placebo. Results were clinically significant, showing that FSC reduced the risk of dying at any time by 18 percent compared with placebo over the 3-year period, with absolute reduction rates being 15.2 percent and 12.6 percent, respectively. Secondary endpoints also were significant, including reduction in exacerbations, improvement in quality of life, and lung function. Furthermore, there was a trend in the reduction in COPD-related mortality with FSC vs placebo (6.0% vs 4.7%). Overall, survival was better for patients on combined therapy than for FP alone. Mortality for the active combination also was lower than for SAL, but the difference was not statistically significant.

"We do not know the exact mechanism by which this combined therapy works better than the separate therapies. We speculate that synergistic action on cell receptors may lead to less muscle contraction or inflammation," said Dr. Celli. "Although we do not expect the combination therapy to replace existing therapies, it will allow greater room for intervention for health-care providers treating patients with COPD."

"COPD is a progressive and debilitating lung disease most often caused by smoking," said Mark J. Rosen, MD, FCCP, President of the American College of Chest Physicians. "There is no cure for COPD, but smoking cessation and other effective treatments can slow the damage brought about by smoking. Physicians should encourage their patients who smoke to quit in order to avoid further lung damage."

CHEST 2006 is the 72nd annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians, held October 21-26 in Salt Lake City, UT. ACCP represents 16,500 members who provide clinical respiratory, critical care, sleep, and cardiothoracic patient care in the United States and throughout the world. The ACCP's mission is to promote the prevention and treatment of diseases of the chest through leadership, education, research, and communication. For more information about the ACCP, please visit the ACCP Web site at http://www.chestnet.org.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American College of Chest Physicians. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American College of Chest Physicians. "Drug Combo Improves Survival In Patients With COPD." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 October 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061024010739.htm>.
American College of Chest Physicians. (2006, October 25). Drug Combo Improves Survival In Patients With COPD. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061024010739.htm
American College of Chest Physicians. "Drug Combo Improves Survival In Patients With COPD." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061024010739.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

AP (July 31, 2014) Sarasota County, Florida health officials have issued a warning against eating raw oysters and exposing open wounds to coastal and inland waters after a dangerous bacteria killed one person and made another sick. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Peace Corps Pulls Workers From W. Africa Over Ebola Fears

Newsy (July 30, 2014) The Peace Corps is one of several U.S.-based organizations to pull workers out of West Africa because of the Ebola outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Weather Kills 2K A Year, But Storms Aren't The Main Offender

Newsy (July 30, 2014) Health officials say 2,000 deaths occur each year in the U.S. due to weather, but it's excessive heat and cold that claim the most lives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins