Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Disrupting Brain's Stress System Intensifies Opiate Withdrawal

Date:
February 28, 2007
Source:
Cell Press
Summary:
Avoiding the severe pain, nausea, agitation, sweats and other symptoms of opiate withdrawal are among the many reasons addicts are motivated to continue taking drugs. Now, researchers have found that disrupting the brain's stress-response mechanism exacerbates behavioral withdrawal symptoms in mice, and that giving the mice the hormone corticosterone alleviates those symptoms. The researchers said their findings suggest new approaches to reduce withdrawal symptoms.

Avoiding the severe pain, nausea, agitation, sweats and other symptoms of opiate withdrawal are among the many reasons addicts are motivated to continue taking drugs. Now, researchers have found that disrupting the brain's stress-response mechanism exacerbates behavioral withdrawal symptoms in mice, and that giving the mice the hormone corticosterone alleviates those symptoms. The researchers said their findings suggest new approaches to reduce withdrawal symptoms.

Angelo Contarino of Université Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2 and colleagues published their findings in the February 15, 2007 issue of the journal Neuron, published by Cell Press.

In their studies, the researchers mimicked the pattern of opiate addiction and withdrawal in mice that were genetically deficient in a receptor called CRF1. Receptors are proteins on the cell surface that trigger reactions in the cell when activated. CRF1 is a trigger for the corticotrophin-releasing factor system in the brain and is an essential protein for coping with stressful events. In mimicking addiction and withdrawal, the researchers gave the mice increasing doses of morphine and then stopped morphine administration to induce withdrawal symptoms.

The researchers found that the CRF1-deficient mice showed more severe and prolonged behavioral symptoms of withdrawal--such as jumping and "wet dog shaking"--when compared with normal mice as had been shown previously. Similarly, when the researchers administered a drug that blocks the receptor in normal mice, they saw the same aggravating effects.

The researchers also detected genetic changes in the brains of the mice, which indicated that the stress-response circuitry in the brain was impaired.

However, Contarino and colleagues found that giving the mice the steroid hormone corticosterone abolished the difference in withdrawal symptoms between the CRF1-deficient and normal mice. The hormone also restored the normal stress-response-related genetic activity in the brain, they found.

"The findings of the present study demonstrate that, like hyperactive stress systems, severe deficiencies in major components of the stress-responsive system may worsen the somatic reactions to drug withdrawal," the researchers concluded.

The researchers include Francesco Papaleo, Université Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2 and Unité INSERM 588 in Bordeaux, France and University of Padova in Padova, Italy; Pierre Kitchener of Unité INSERM 588 in Bordeaux, France; Angelo Contarino of Université Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2 and Unité INSERM 588 in Bordeaux, France and University of Padova in Padova, Italy.

A.C. was supported by a research grant from the University of Padova and the European Union Grant MCIF HPMF-CT-2001-01327. F.P. was supported by a Ph.D. Fellowship grant from the University of Padova, Italy. P.K. was supported by a Ph.D. Fellowship grant from the University Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Bordeaux, France.

Papaleo et al.: "Disruption of the CRF/CRF1 Receptor Stress System Exacerbates the Somatic Signs of Opiate Withdrawal." Neuron 53, 577--589, February 15, 2007. DOI 10.1016/j.neuron.2007.01.022. http://www.neuron.org.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cell Press. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Cell Press. "Disrupting Brain's Stress System Intensifies Opiate Withdrawal." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 February 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070215145046.htm>.
Cell Press. (2007, February 28). Disrupting Brain's Stress System Intensifies Opiate Withdrawal. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070215145046.htm
Cell Press. "Disrupting Brain's Stress System Intensifies Opiate Withdrawal." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070215145046.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Your Birth Season Might Determine Your Temperament

Your Birth Season Might Determine Your Temperament

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) — A new study says the season you're born in can determine your temperament — and one season has a surprising outcome. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Court Ruling Means Kids' Online Activity Could Be On Parents

Court Ruling Means Kids' Online Activity Could Be On Parents

Newsy (Oct. 17, 2014) — In a ruling attorneys for both sides agreed was a first of its kind, a Georgia appeals court said parents can be held liable for what kids put online. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Foods To Boost Your Mood

The Best Foods To Boost Your Mood

Buzz60 (Oct. 17, 2014) — Feeling down? Reach for the refrigerator, not the medicine cabinet! TC Newman (@PurpleTCNewman) shares some of the best foods to boost your mood. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
You Can Get Addicted To Google Glass, Apparently

You Can Get Addicted To Google Glass, Apparently

Newsy (Oct. 15, 2014) — Researchers claim they’ve diagnosed the first example of the disorder in a 31-year-old U.S. Navy serviceman. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins