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Proteasome Activator Enhances Survival Of Huntington's Disease Neuronal Model Cells

Date:
March 1, 2007
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
These remarkable results demonstrate for the first time that it is possible to intervene therapeutically in the proteolytic pathways and organelles that participate in the specific degradation of misfolded and abnormal proteins.

To function, each living cell needs both to build new and to degrade old or damaged proteins. To accomplish that, a number of intracellular systems work in concert to keep the cell healthy and from clogging up with damaged proteins. When proteins or peptides mutate, they can present major problems to the clearing up of the intracellular environment. In Huntington's disease (HD) the disease provoking mutation in the huntingtin gene eventually causes the cell to build up intranuclear and cellular inclusions of protein-aggregates, made up primarily of huntingtin. One cellular organelle with a central role of clearing such protein build up in the cell is the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS).

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In Huntington's disease (HD) brains and other tissues, UPS activity is inhibited and intraneuronal nuclear protein aggregates of mutant huntingtin in HD brains indicate dysfunction of the UPS. From these results, we hypothesized that enhancing UPS function would improve catalytic degradation of abnormal proteins in HD. We first genetically engineered proteasome activators involved in either non-ubiquitinated protein degradation pathways (PA28ƒ×) or subunits of PA700, the 26S proteasome ubiquitinated pathway (S5a) into transducible lentiviral vectors. To address the therapeutic hypothesis experimentally, we transduced UPS subunits into HD skin fibroblasts or HD mutant protein expressing striatum-derived neurons. We determined how this intervention altered cell survival after exposure to toxins known to simulate pathological mechanisms in HD.

The manuscript shows that cellular changes due to expression of huntingtin protein with longer CAG repeats can reduce the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) function in Huntingtonˇ¦s disease cells. Following compromise of the UPS, the overexpression of proteasome activator PA28 can specifically recover proteasome function and improve cell viability in both HD model and patient cells.

These remarkable results demonstrate for the first time that it is possible to intervene therapeutically in the proteolytic pathways and organelles that participate in the specific degradation of misfolded and abnormal proteins.

Citation: Seo H, Sonntag K-C, Kim W, Cattaneo E, Isacson O (2007) Proteasome Activator Enhances Survival of Huntingtonˇ¦s Disease Neuronal Model Cells. PLoS ONE 2(2): e238. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000238 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0000238 )


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The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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Public Library of Science. "Proteasome Activator Enhances Survival Of Huntington's Disease Neuronal Model Cells." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 March 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070228064850.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2007, March 1). Proteasome Activator Enhances Survival Of Huntington's Disease Neuronal Model Cells. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070228064850.htm
Public Library of Science. "Proteasome Activator Enhances Survival Of Huntington's Disease Neuronal Model Cells." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/02/070228064850.htm (accessed March 30, 2015).

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