Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists Develop Plans For Ultimate Microscope

Date:
March 22, 2007
Source:
University of Sheffield
Summary:
Scientists have developed an innovative way to take images of atoms in living cells without using a lens. They now plan to develop the ultimate X-ray microscope, which could be used to take high-resolution 3-D images of any molecular structure.

Scientists at the University of Sheffield have developed an innovative way to take images of atoms in living cells without using a lens. They now plan to develop the ultimate x-ray microscope, which could be used to take high-resolution 3D images of any molecular structure.

Professor John Rodenburg and colleagues from the University΄s Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, in collaboration with Swiss Paul Scherrer Institut, have been able to greatly enhance the image capability of existing x-ray microscopes without using a lens.

They have now received a £4.3 million Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) grant to develop the new x-ray microscope together with similar methods in electron and visible light microscopy.

In traditional microscopes a lens is used to produce a magnified image. This method relies on the waves that make up the radiation, for example light, to interfere with one another to build up the image. However, the tiniest error in the lens can make the waves interfere incorrectly, ruining the image. For this reason, a typical x-ray microscope image is about one hundred times more blurred than it should be.

The Sheffield scientists have developed a new technique which uses diffraction patterns collected from different areas of the object to provide information about how the object has scattered the X-rays. They then use these patterns, along with computing programs based on a mathematical algorithm, to give a complete picture of the structure. This means that objects of any size or shape can be imaged at high-quality.

Professor Rodenburg said: "The technique has revolutionary implications for x-ray imaging of individual atoms in any structure. The key development is that we can now use a computer to calculate the phase of the high-resolution data – something which could never be seen by the lens alone.

"It is even possible to contemplate a solid-state optical microscope, built into a single chip with no optical elements at all. All the weakness, difficulties and costs of lenses would be therefore replaced by a combination of good quality detectors and computers."

He added: "Our ultimate aim is to be able to take high resolution 3D images of any molecular structure, using the ultimate X-ray or electron microscope."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Sheffield. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Sheffield. "Scientists Develop Plans For Ultimate Microscope." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 March 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070319175757.htm>.
University of Sheffield. (2007, March 22). Scientists Develop Plans For Ultimate Microscope. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070319175757.htm
University of Sheffield. "Scientists Develop Plans For Ultimate Microscope." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070319175757.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Japan Looks To Faster Future As Bullet Train Turns 50

Japan Looks To Faster Future As Bullet Train Turns 50

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) — Japan's bullet train turns 50 Wednesday. Here's a look at how it's changed over half a century — and the changes it's inspired globally. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
US Police Put Body Cameras to the Test

US Police Put Body Cameras to the Test

AFP (Oct. 1, 2014) — Police body cameras are gradually being rolled out across the US, with interest surging after the fatal police shooting in August of an unarmed black teenager. Duration: 02:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Japan Celebrates 'bullet Train' Anniversary

Raw: Japan Celebrates 'bullet Train' Anniversary

AP (Oct. 1, 2014) — A ceremony marking 50 years since Japan launched its Shinkansen bullet train was held on Wednesday in Tokyo. The latest model can travel from Tokyo to Osaka, a distance of 319 miles, in two hours and 25 minutes. (Oct. 1) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins