Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists Progress In Successful Tissue Engineering

Date:
March 25, 2007
Source:
International & American Association for Dental Research
Summary:
Tissue engineering is a relatively new field of basic and clinical science that is concerned, in part, with creating tissues that can augment or replace injured, defective, or diseased body parts.

Tissue engineering is a relatively new field of basic and clinical science that is concerned, in part, with creating tissues that can augment or replace injured, defective, or diseased body parts. The approach to fabricating the tissues involves adding specific cell types to grow on a polymer scaffold having the shape of the tissue to be restored. The scaffold gradually disappears, while the cells continue developing in the scaffold shape. With the use of non-human animal cells, there has been considerable recent progress made in the engineering of skin, bladder, cartilage, and several other tissues.

Scientists are currently reporting on experiments applying human cells from cartilage (chondrocytes) on a scaffold. If the chondrocytes could be successfully grown in this manner, they were also interested in determining whether their development could be enhanced by a protein (osteogenic protein-1) that was known to increase production by chondrocytes of a major cartilage extracellular matrix component, proteoglycan. This study had not been undertaken previously.

Experiments were conducted as follows: Normal ankle cartilage was obtained from a deceased adult through the Gift of Hope Organ & Tissue Donor Network in Elmhurst, IL. The chondrocytes from the cartilage were isolated and purified by standard laboratory procedures. They were then applied to small polymer (polyglycolic acid) scaffolds that were disc-shaped.

Three such constructs were created for comparison of possible cell growth and proteoglycan production. The first consisted of a scaffold treated with cells only, the second a scaffold with cells to which osteogenic protein-1 (from Stryker Biotech, Hopkinton, MA) was added drop-wise, and the third a scaffold incorporating timed-release capsules of osteogenic protein-1 together with cells. The constructs were maintained for 4 weeks and then analyzed for the presence of chondrocytes and production of proteoglycan. Results showed successful tissue engineering of the chondrocytes on scaffolds and enhancement of proteoglycan production with osteogenic protein-1 delivered to the cells by either droplet addition or timed release.

The studies established that human chondrocytes are able to develop cartilage by the tissue-engineering methods used, and promise further advances toward therapeutic tissue engineering by laboratory means.

This is a summary of abstract #1415, "Human Chondrocyte-seeded Tissue-engineered Scaffolds and OP-1 Effects", by W. Landis et al., of the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine presented during the 85th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by International & American Association for Dental Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

International & American Association for Dental Research. "Scientists Progress In Successful Tissue Engineering." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 March 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070323114012.htm>.
International & American Association for Dental Research. (2007, March 25). Scientists Progress In Successful Tissue Engineering. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070323114012.htm
International & American Association for Dental Research. "Scientists Progress In Successful Tissue Engineering." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070323114012.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Boy Attacked by Shark in Florida

Boy Attacked by Shark in Florida

Reuters - US Online Video (July 24, 2014) An 8-year-old boy is bitten in the leg by a shark while vacationing at a Florida beach. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 24, 2014) The eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo, mainly known for conflict and instability, is an unlikely place for the production of fine cheese. But a farm in the village of Masisi, in North Kivu is slowly transforming perceptions of the area. Known simply as Goma cheese, the Congolese version of Dutch gouda has gained popularity through out the region. Ciara Sutton reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dogs Appear To Become Jealous Of Owners' Attention

Dogs Appear To Become Jealous Of Owners' Attention

Newsy (July 23, 2014) A U.C. San Diego researcher says jealousy isn't just a human trait, and dogs aren't the best at sharing the attention of humans with other dogs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Professor Creates Site Revealing Where People's Cats Live

Professor Creates Site Revealing Where People's Cats Live

Newsy (July 23, 2014) ​It's called I Know Where Your Cat Lives, and you can keep hitting the "Random Cat" button to find more real cats all over the world. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile: iPhone Android Web
          Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins