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Tissue Engineering For Craniofacial Reconstruction

Date:
March 26, 2007
Source:
International & American Association for Dental Research
Summary:
Tissue engineering has emerged as a promising alternative for the reconstitution of lost or damaged organs and tissues, circumventing the complications associated with traditional transplants.

Tissue engineering has emerged as a promising alternative for the reconstitution of lost or damaged organs and tissues, circumventing the complications associated with traditional transplants.

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Tissue engineers attempt to repair or regenerate damaged tissue by using engineered tissue substitutes that can sustain functionality during regeneration and eventually integrate into the host tissue. The traditional tissue-engineering paradigm combines isolated cells with appropriate bioactive agents in a biomaterial scaffold. It is widely recognized that scaffold architecture can profoundly influence the behavior of cells on tissue-engineering constructs.

Today, during the 85th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research, scientists are reporting on High Internal Phase Emulsion (HIPE) polymerization, which affords tremendous control of scaffold morphology. HIPEs can be readily molded into the irregular shapes often required in craniofacial reconstruction and cured in situ to a rigid foam.

They have demonstrated that emulsion templating can be used to generate rigid, biodegradable scaffolds with interconnected pores. These scaffolds are of particular interest in craniofacial tissue engineering, due to the rigidity of the resulting foams and the ease of fabrication.

This is a summary of abstract #1598, "Biodegradable PolyHIPEs as Tissue-engineering Scaffolds for Craniofacial Reconstruction", by E.M. Christenson et al., of the University of Durham, UK, to be presented during the 85th General Session of the International Association for Dental Research.


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The above story is based on materials provided by International & American Association for Dental Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

International & American Association for Dental Research. "Tissue Engineering For Craniofacial Reconstruction." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 March 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070323171654.htm>.
International & American Association for Dental Research. (2007, March 26). Tissue Engineering For Craniofacial Reconstruction. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 21, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070323171654.htm
International & American Association for Dental Research. "Tissue Engineering For Craniofacial Reconstruction." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070323171654.htm (accessed April 21, 2015).

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