Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Over Half The World's Magnolia Species Face Extinction In Their Native Forests

Date:
April 15, 2007
Source:
Bournemouth University
Summary:
Experts say over half the world's magnolia species face extinction in their native forest habitats. Magnolias are among the most ancient groups of flowering plants and have long been cultivated by mankind.

Magnolias are among the most ancient groups of flowering plants and have long been cultivated by mankind.
Credit: Charles Elder

A mapping exercise by experts from Bournemouth University’s School of Conservation Sciences has revealed that over half of the world’s magnolia species face extinction in their native forest habitats.

The Red List of the Magnoliace is co-authored by Professor Adrian Newton and Daniele Cicuzza from BU’s Environmental and Geographical Sciences Group together with Sara Oldfield of Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI).

The Red List identifies threats to the existence of magnolia species including the destruction of habitat to make way for agriculture, and over-exploitation. It claims that 131 wild maganolias from a total of 245 species worldwide are in danger of extinction.

Magnolias are among the most ancient groups of flowering plants and have long been cultivated by mankind. Some specimens growing in the precincts of Chinese temples are estimated to be up to 800 years old.

The significance of their potential loss is considered by experts as a threat to the genetic diversity of the species. Magnolias also serve as highly sensitive indicators of the well-being of the forests in which they are found.

Professor Newton’s comprehensive mapping exercise underpins the general report published by BGCI and Fauna and Flora International (FFI).

“The maps provide an excellent baseline for future monitoring and conservation planning at a time of rapid environmental change,” said Professor Newton. “Comparing species distribution with forest cover for a whole family of flowering plants gives us a unique snapshot of forest biodiversity.”

Sara Oldfield added: "There is a strong chance that these species will become extinct unless we take action now. That would be a tragedy because they're so important in local livelihoods and also we would be losing some beautiful trees for ever."

Some two thirds of known magnolia species are found in Asia, with over 40 per cent occurring in southern China. According to the report half of all wild Chinese magnolias are at risk of extinction. In the Americas, north and south, where magnolias are also found in the wild, a similar picture is emerging. In Colombia, for example, the report concludes that the threat of extinction hangs over 30 of its native species.

Drawing on the report’s findings BGCI and FFI are collaborating through the Global Trees Campaign to boost conservation efforts for threatened magnolias.

Later this month, at the 3rd Global Botanic Gardens Congress in Wuhan, China (April 16 - 20, 2007), BGCI will launch a survey of botanic garden collections of threatened magnolias species.

This will enable BGCI to identify precisely which threatened species are not yet held in ex situ collections (in botanic gardens and arboreta, etc.), and take action to ensure that integrated conservation measures for these species are developed and implemented.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Bournemouth University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Bournemouth University. "Over Half The World's Magnolia Species Face Extinction In Their Native Forests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 April 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070407170724.htm>.
Bournemouth University. (2007, April 15). Over Half The World's Magnolia Species Face Extinction In Their Native Forests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070407170724.htm
Bournemouth University. "Over Half The World's Magnolia Species Face Extinction In Their Native Forests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070407170724.htm (accessed August 23, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Endangered Red Wolves Face Uncertain Future

Endangered Red Wolves Face Uncertain Future

AP (Aug. 22, 2014) A federal judge temporarily banned coyote hunting to save endangered red wolves, but local hunters say that the wolf preservation program does more harm than good. Meanwhile federal officials are reviewing its wolf program in North Carolina. (Aug. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Farm Resurgence Grows With Younger Crowd

Farm Resurgence Grows With Younger Crowd

AP (Aug. 22, 2014) New England farms are seeing a surge in younger farm hands as the 'buy local' food movement grows across the country. (Aug. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) An experimental drug used to treat Marburg virus in rhesus monkeys could give new insight into a similar treatment for Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Terrifying City-Dwelling Spiders Are Bigger And More Fertile

Terrifying City-Dwelling Spiders Are Bigger And More Fertile

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) According to a new study, spiders that live in cities are bigger, fatter and multiply faster. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins