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Red Meat Linked To Breast Cancer

Date:
April 8, 2007
Source:
University of Leeds
Summary:
Eating red meat increases a woman's chance of developing breast cancer, according to new research from the University of Leeds.
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Eating red meat increases a woman’s chance of developing breast cancer, according to new research from the University of Leeds.

The findings are most striking for post-menopausal women – those with the highest intake of red meat, the equivalent to one portion a day (more than 57 grams) - run a 56 per cent greater risk of breast cancer than those who eat none.

Women who eat the most processed meat, such as bacon, sausages, ham or pies, run a 64 per cent greater risk of breast cancer than those who eat none.

Researchers at the University’s Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics have been tracking the eating habits and health of more than 35,000 women for the past seven years, and their latest findings are published in the British Journal of Cancer. Earlier findings, widely reported in January, showed that pre-menopausal women who have the greatest intake of fibre have cut their risk of breast cancer in half.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University of Leeds. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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University of Leeds. "Red Meat Linked To Breast Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 April 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070407174018.htm>.
University of Leeds. (2007, April 8). Red Meat Linked To Breast Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070407174018.htm
University of Leeds. "Red Meat Linked To Breast Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070407174018.htm (accessed August 30, 2015).

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