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Gloomy Forecast From Climate Experts

Date:
April 10, 2007
Source:
University of Adelaide
Summary:
More cyclones, rising sea levels and increased flooding will be the pattern for Australia's coastal communities by 2050, according to one of Australia's leading climate change experts, Professor Nick Harvey. The University of Adelaide professor is one of five Australian lead authors on the Australia and New Zealand Chapter of the IPCC Working Group II, the global body assessing the scientific evidence for climate change.

More cyclones, rising sea levels and increased flooding will be the pattern for Australia's coastal communities by 2050, according to one of Australia's leading climate change experts, Professor Nick Harvey.

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The University of Adelaide professor is one of five Australian lead authors on the Australia and New Zealand Chapter of the IPCC Working Group II, the global body assessing the scientific evidence for climate change.

IPCC released the group's report, called Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability, in Brussels at 6pm EST on Easter Friday. It addresses the vulnerability of socio-economic and natural systems to climate change and options for adapting to them. The first volume of the IPCC report was released in Paris in February.

The second report reveals that, in Australia, sea levels are likely to rise by more than half a metre by the end of this century.

"We will experience more intense tropical cyclones and storms will be more frequent," Professor Harvey says. "Places like Cairns and southeast Queensland will be most vulnerable."

The report discloses that unusually high sea surface temperatures have bleached up to 50% of reefs in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park since 1979 and freshwater swamps in northern Australia have been infiltrated by saltwater since the 1950s.

Further south, about one fifth of Tasmania's coastline is at risk of serious erosion in the next 50-100 years as a result of rising sea levels. "On a global scale, sea levels have risen at an average of 1.8mm a year between 1961 and 2003," Professor Harvey says.

"Hundreds of millions of people will be vulnerable to flooding by the end of the century due to rising sea levels, especially in densely populated and low-lying settlements. The greatest populations at risk are in Asia and the Pacific."

Four lead authors, including Professor Harvey, will provide a media briefing in Sydney on Tuesday 10 April to comment on the expected impacts of climate change on Australia and New Zealand. Areas discussed will include water resources, ecosystems, agriculture, coasts, settlements, societies and industries, and health.

The report, Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability, is the second volume of the IPCC's Fourth Assessment on global warming involving 2500 of the world's most respected scientists, including 25 from Australia.

IPCC, or Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, was established by two United Nations Organisations - the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Adelaide. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Adelaide. "Gloomy Forecast From Climate Experts." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 April 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070409223406.htm>.
University of Adelaide. (2007, April 10). Gloomy Forecast From Climate Experts. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070409223406.htm
University of Adelaide. "Gloomy Forecast From Climate Experts." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/04/070409223406.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

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