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Scientists Develop Artificial Blood

Date:
May 14, 2007
Source:
University Of Sheffield
Summary:
Scientists are developing an artificial `plastic blood' which could act as a substitute for real blood in emergency situations. The `plastic blood' could have a huge impact on military applications.

Artificial blood.
Credit: Image courtesy of University Of Sheffield

Scientists from the University of Sheffield are developing an artificial `plastic blood´, which could act as a substitute for real blood in emergency situations. The `plastic blood´ could have a huge impact on military applications.

Because the artificial blood is made from a plastic, it is light to carry and easy to store. Doctors could store the substitute as a thick paste in a blood bag and then dissolve it in water just before giving it to patients – meaning it´s easier to transport than liquid blood.

Donated blood has a relatively short shelf-life of 35 days, after which it must be thrown away. It also needs refrigeration, whereas the `plastic blood´ will be storable for many more days and is stable at room temperature.

The artificial blood is made of plastic molecules that hold an iron atom at their core, just like haemoglobin, that can bind oxygen and could transport it around the body. The small plastic molecules join together in a tree-like branching structure, with a size and shape very similar to that of natural haemoglobin molecules. This creates the right environment for the iron to bind oxygen in the lungs and release it in the body.

While still in its development, the scientists hope this will make it particularly useful for military applications and being plastic, it´s also affordable. The scientists are now seeking further funding to develop a final prototype that would be suitable for biological testing.

Dr Lance Twyman, from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Sheffield and who has been developing the artificial blood for the last five years, said: "We are very excited about the potential for this product and about the fact that this could save lives. Many people die from superficial wounds when they are trapped in an accident or are injured on the battlefield and can´t get blood before they get to hospital. This product can be stored a lot more easily than blood, meaning large quantities could be carried easily by ambulances and the armed forces.

He added: "I hope people take the opportunity to go and see the display at the Science Museum and hopefully in the future it will be more than just a prototype, but will be a real product used in life or death situations."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Sheffield. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Sheffield. "Scientists Develop Artificial Blood." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 May 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070512113724.htm>.
University Of Sheffield. (2007, May 14). Scientists Develop Artificial Blood. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070512113724.htm
University Of Sheffield. "Scientists Develop Artificial Blood." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070512113724.htm (accessed August 23, 2014).

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