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Welcome To A New Era In Recycling Of Plastics

Date:
June 25, 2007
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
In an advance toward a new era in recycling of plastics, scientists in Japan are reporting development of a process that breaks certain plastics down into their original chemical ingredients, which can be reused to make new, high quality plastic. That approach fostered recycling of beverage cans, scrap steel, and glass containers, which are melted to produce aluminum, glass and steel.

In an advance toward a new era in recycling of plastics, scientists in Japan are reporting development of a process that breaks certain plastics down into their original chemical ingredients, which can be reused to make new, high quality plastic. That approach fostered recycling of beverage cans, scrap steel, and glass containers, which are melted to produce aluminum, glass and steel.

However, no process has emerged to depolymerize, or breakdown, the long chains of molecules that make up millions of pounds of polymer, or plastic, materials that are trashed each year. Instead, recycling of certain plastics involves melting and reforming into plastic that is less pure than the original.

Akio Kamimura and Shigehiro Yamamoto report invention of an efficient new method to depolymerize polyamide plastics -- which include nylon and Kevlar -- The technology, still at the laboratory-scale stage, does not require costly pressure chambers, extreme temperatures, or high energy inputs. Rather, it uses ordinary laboratory glassware.

The method relies on ionic liquids, liquids that contain only ions (atoms with an electric charge) and are powerful solvents. Researchers used an ionic liquid that changed nylon-6 into its component compound, captrolactam, and could be recycled and reused multiple times. "This is the first example of the use of ionic liquids for effective depolymerization of polymeric materials and will open a new field in ionic liquid chemistry as well as plastic recycling," the report states.

The article, "An Efficient Method to Depolymerize Polyamide Plastics: A New Use of Ionic Liquids," is scheduled for publication in the July 5 issue of ACS' Organic Letters.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Welcome To A New Era In Recycling Of Plastics." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 June 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070625092738.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2007, June 25). Welcome To A New Era In Recycling Of Plastics. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070625092738.htm
American Chemical Society. "Welcome To A New Era In Recycling Of Plastics." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070625092738.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

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