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Hearing Skills Of Barn Owls Could Map Way To Find Problems In Humans

Date:
August 3, 2007
Source:
University of Oregon
Summary:
The hearing precision that lets common barn owls find prey is helping researchers fine tune their quest to diagnose a variety of problems rooted in the human brain, not only with hearing but also with behavior and potentially damaged areas.

Barn owl peering out of a knothole in a cottonwood tree.
Credit: iStockphoto

The hearing precision that lets common barn owls find prey is helping researchers fine tune their quest to diagnose a variety of problems rooted in the human brain, not only with hearing but also with behavior and potentially damaged areas.

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University of Oregon researchers have found that barn owls (Tyto alba) are better able to track changes in the location of a noise, such as that made by a potential meal, when the sound source moves horizontally than when the sound changes direction vertically. The discovery was made using an infrared-monitoring procedure that measures pupil dilation responses that are influenced by changes in sound sources around an owl.

"When we are looking at problems of spatial localization, or how to locate sound in a space, the barn owl provides a great system," said Avinash D.S. Bala, a researcher in the University of Oregon's Institute of Neuroscience and lead author of a new study.

The findings -- published in Aug. 1 issue of PLoS One-- confirms and solidifies the results of an earlier study (Nature, Aug. 14, 2003), in which Bala and colleagues first documented the brain mapping of firing neurons to horizontal changes in the source of noises in the owl's brain.

Bala was the lead author on both projects, which were done in collaboration with former UO researcher Matthew W. Spitzer, who now is at Monash University in Australia, and principal investigator Terry T. Takahashi, a UO professor of biology and researcher in the Institute of Neuroscience.

"The barn owl has a portion of the midbrain which serves as a map," Bala said. "Neuron activity can be traced in the map as sound moves. Looking at this map, you can decipher which sounds are being received more actively."

The new study, in which conclusions were based on the recordings of 62 neurons that represent auditory space, also sheds light on how outside information is converted into electrical activity and transformed into behavior.

"The brain, in the case of spatial hearing, judges neuronal activity in a democratic manner," Bala said. "It listens to the responses of neurons, and it goes with an approximate average of responses. This has the advantage of reducing environmental noise that is inducing false positives, which would be more common if the owl was depending on only a few neurons. Overall sensitivity might go down, but the probability of an owl actually hitting its prey becomes much higher."

The monitoring procedure Bala and colleagues have devised, which is in the early stages of human application, has the potential to use the eyes, through changes in the size of the pupil, as a gateway to the human brain. The system would allow for measuring the response to different aspects of sound, such as volume, pitch and location, as well as diagnosing basic sensory deficits and identify areas of damage in the brain.

The National Institute of Deafness and Communication Disorders and the McKnight Foundation, a private Minnesota-based philanthropic organization, funded the work through grants to Takahashi. Spitzer was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Oregon. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Oregon. "Hearing Skills Of Barn Owls Could Map Way To Find Problems In Humans." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 August 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070801091509.htm>.
University of Oregon. (2007, August 3). Hearing Skills Of Barn Owls Could Map Way To Find Problems In Humans. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070801091509.htm
University of Oregon. "Hearing Skills Of Barn Owls Could Map Way To Find Problems In Humans." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/08/070801091509.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

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