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Spinning A New Role For CDs And CD Players

Date:
September 25, 2007
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
CD-ROMs and DVDs and the hardware used to play these popular audio and video compact discs (CDs) have "enormous" potential as a new generation of portable, inexpensive instruments for home health monitoring and laboratory-based testing, scientists are reporting. CD technology could be adapted for tests ranging from the measurement of environmental toxins to at-home disease diagnosis, their report said.
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CD-ROMs and DVDs and the hardware used to play these popular audio and video compact discs (CDs) have "enormous" potential as a new generation of portable, inexpensive instruments for home health monitoring and laboratory-based testing, scientists in Spain are reporting.

CD technology could be adapted for tests ranging from the measurement of environmental toxins to at-home disease diagnosis, their report said.

In the study, Angel Maquieira and colleagues demonstrated technology that uses ordinary CDs and CD players as analytical tools with the potential for performing a range of key laboratory tests. As proof of principle, they developed a CD with a surface coating of so-called immunoassay materials and used it to identify three pesticides -- 2,4,5-TP, chlorpyriphos, and metolachlor -- placed on the disc. Upon spinning in a CD player with its standard laser light, the compounds caused changes in light intensity. A computer interpreted those changes and correctly named the compounds.

"The obtained results show the enormous prospective of compact discs in combination with CD players for multiresidue and drug discovery applications," the article states. The researchers are currently working on ways to increase the sensitivity and versatility of the new technique.

Article: "Microimmunoanalysis on Standard Compact Discs To Determine Low Abundant Compounds" October 15, Analytical Chemistry


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The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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American Chemical Society. "Spinning A New Role For CDs And CD Players." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 September 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070924094625.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2007, September 25). Spinning A New Role For CDs And CD Players. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070924094625.htm
American Chemical Society. "Spinning A New Role For CDs And CD Players." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070924094625.htm (accessed May 28, 2015).

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