Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Want Antioxidants? Have You Eaten Micro-algae Lately?

Date:
October 13, 2007
Source:
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Summary:
Some consumers want more than just their traditional nourishment requirements met. Micro-algae (eaten by humans in pre-Columbian America) are more than just nutritive. Spirulina microalgae could be a good source of antioxidants due to the presence of carotenoids deriving from chlorophyll, and provide bacterial growth inhibiting action because of certain fatty acids.

Some consumers want more than just their traditional nourishment requirements met. Micro-algae (eaten by humans in pre-Columbian America) are more than just nutritive. Spirulina microalgae could be a good source of antioxidants due to the presence of carotenoids deriving from chlorophyll, and provide bacterial growth inhibiting action because of certain fatty acids. Microalgae have turned out to be a potential alternative to the use of synthetic sources for these ingredients.

Related Articles


Spirulina is a type of microalgae that naturally produces antioxidants (like carotenoids and Xanthophylls), and antimicrobial compounds like polysaccharides or fatty acids among other beneficial substances.

The extraction process using supercritical fluids, (supercritical fluids are any substance above certain set pressure and temperature conditions known as their critical point, that grants them physical properties in between those of liquids and gases) has taken shape in the last few years as an alternative to the classic extraction means. It shortens the extraction times and does not require the use of organic solvents that damage health and the environment.

The most common supercritical fluid used is carbon dioxide, because of its zero toxicity, versatility, price and relatively soft critical conditions (73 bar, 31 ºC), besides these advantages, being a gas at room temperature, it does not leave residue in the extracted substance.

The work carried out by the associated unit for food science Universidad Autónoma de Madrid –Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas consisted in the development of an extraction method using supercritical CO2 and the posterior analysis of the obtained substance by in vitro methods to evaluate its antioxidant and antimicrobial capabilities. Then a chemical analysis of the extract was carried out using chromatographical techniques in order to correlate the activity of the substance to its chemical composition.

The results show that the Spirulina microalgae could be a good source of functional food ingredients with antioxidant action thanks to the presence of carotenoids deriving from chlorophyll, and bacterial growth inhibiting action thanks to certain fatty acids.

In optimal extraction conditions (220 bar y 55 ºC) an extract can be obtained with both a high activity as an antioxidant and antimicrobial action, thanks to the combined method of extraction-fractionation developed by this research group.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. "Want Antioxidants? Have You Eaten Micro-algae Lately?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071011211306.htm>.
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. (2007, October 13). Want Antioxidants? Have You Eaten Micro-algae Lately?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071011211306.htm
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. "Want Antioxidants? Have You Eaten Micro-algae Lately?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071011211306.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) — A dongle that plugs into a Smartphone mimics a lab-based blood test for HIV and syphilis and can detect the diseases in 15 minutes, say researchers. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) — An Italian doctor is saying he could stick someone&apos;s head onto someone else&apos;s body. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) reports. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

Newsy (Feb. 27, 2015) — A new study from researchers at New York University suggests dentists could soon use blood samples taken from patients&apos; mouths to test for diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) — If you&apos;re looking to boost your health this season, there are a few quick and easy steps to prompt you for success. Krystin Goodwin (@Krystingoodwin) has the best tips to give your health a makeover this spring! Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins