Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Supernovae Not What They Used To Be; Distant Supernovae Distinctly Brighter

Date:
October 28, 2007
Source:
University Of Toronto
Summary:
Exploding stars that light the way for research on dark energy aren't as powerful or bright, on average, as they once were, say astronomers. The study, which compared supernovae in nearby galaxies with those that exploded up to nine billion light years away in the distant universe, found the distant supernovae were an average of 12 per cent brighter. The distant supernovae were brighter because they were younger, the study found.

Using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers pinpointed a blaze of light from the farthest supernova ever seen, SN 1997ff -- a dying star that exploded 10 billion years ago.
Credit: NASA/ESA, Adam Riess (Space Telescope Science Institute)

Exploding stars that light the way for research on dark energy aren’t as powerful or bright, on average, as they once were, says a new study by University of Toronto astronomers.

Related Articles


The study, which compared supernovae in nearby galaxies with those that exploded up to nine billion light years away in the distant universe, found the distant supernovae were an average of 12 per cent brighter. The distant supernovae were brighter because they were younger, the study found.

Since uniformly bright exploding stars help astronomers study the nature of dark energy – an unknown type of energy that causes the universe to accelerate its expansion – the team’s findings suggest it could become more difficult to study dark energy in the future. Astronomers can correct for supernovae of varying brightness, but it will prove challenging.

“The findings do not call into question that the universe is accelerating but the evolving mix of supernovae could limit future attempts to determine the nature of dark energy,” said Andrew Howell, lead author of the study and post-doctoral researcher.

“You can think of supernovae as light bulbs,” he said. “We found that the early universe supernovae had a higher wattage, but as long as we can figure out the wattage, we should be able to correct for that. Learning more about dark energy is going to take very precise corrections though and we aren’t sure how well we can do that yet.”

The paper, Predicted and Observed Evolution in the Mean Properties of Type Ia Supernovae with Redshift, was co-authored by post-doctoral researchers Mark Sullivan and Alex Conley and Professor Ray Carlberg of astronomy and astrophysics. It appears in the Sept. 20 issue of the Astrophysical Journal Letters.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Toronto. The original article was written by Christine Elias. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Toronto. "Supernovae Not What They Used To Be; Distant Supernovae Distinctly Brighter." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 October 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071024150023.htm>.
University Of Toronto. (2007, October 28). Supernovae Not What They Used To Be; Distant Supernovae Distinctly Brighter. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071024150023.htm
University Of Toronto. "Supernovae Not What They Used To Be; Distant Supernovae Distinctly Brighter." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071024150023.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Space & Time News

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Black Hole 12 Billion Times the Size of Sun Discovered at Dawn of Universe

Black Hole 12 Billion Times the Size of Sun Discovered at Dawn of Universe

Buzz60 (Feb. 26, 2015) Scientists are saying they&apos;ve spotted a black hole 12 billion time bigger than the sun. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
NASA's Dawn Spacecraft Spots Two Bright Points On Ceres

NASA's Dawn Spacecraft Spots Two Bright Points On Ceres

Newsy (Feb. 26, 2015) NASA scientists still don&apos;t have a clear picture of the bright spots showing up on the surface of Ceres, a minor planet in the asteroid belt. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Astronauts Rig Station for New U.S. Space Taxis

Astronauts Rig Station for New U.S. Space Taxis

Reuters - News Video Online (Feb. 25, 2015) U.S. astronauts float outside the International Space Station to rig parking spots for two commercial space taxis. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Water Leaks Into Astronaut's Helmet

Water Leaks Into Astronaut's Helmet

Reuters - US Online Video (Feb. 25, 2015) A dramatic finish to a spacewalk as NASA astronaut Terry Virts&apos; helmet pools with water. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins