Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Breeding Heat Tolerant Beans To Withstand Warmer World

Date:
November 30, 2007
Source:
US Department of Agriculture
Summary:
Dry common beans--favorites like pinto, kidney, navy, red, black and snap--are grown mostly in the north-central and western regions of the United States. With looming climate change breeding heat-tolerant varieties is important for our future.

Geneticist Tim Porch examines the effects of high-temperature stress on pod development in the common bean.
Credit: Photo by Peggy Greb

Dry common beans—favorites like pinto, kidney, navy, red, black and snap—are grown mostly in the north-central and western regions of the United States. But thousands of miles away, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) geneticist Timothy Porch is working to make good beans even better.

Porch conducts research at the Tropical Agriculture Research Station in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico. He is looking for ways to reduce heat stress in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) grown in the continental United States by breeding heat-tolerant varieties.

Most common beans are adapted to relatively cool climates. But in the United States, common beans are cultivated at average temperatures that can exceed 86 degrees Fahrenheit during the day. These hot summers can hinder the reproductive development of bean crops, which in turn results in smaller potential yields.

However, tropical varieties of Phaseolus contain a much greater range of genetic diversity than the types commercially cultivated in the United States, and may carry traits that protect against heat stress. Porch is trying to bolster U.S. beans with high-temperature adaptations and other producer-friendly traits, such as drought tolerance and disease resistance.

In his search to find novel genetic traits, Porch has worked with two major germplasm centers: the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, in Cali, Colombia; and the ARS Western Regional Plant Introduction Station at Pullman, Wash.

Porch's research will support plant breeders' efforts to develop new bean varieties to meet market demands, increase yields and lower consumer costs. Producers will also be better positioned to respond to possible challenges in the future from emerging diseases and climate change.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by US Department of Agriculture. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

US Department of Agriculture. "Breeding Heat Tolerant Beans To Withstand Warmer World." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 November 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071126152058.htm>.
US Department of Agriculture. (2007, November 30). Breeding Heat Tolerant Beans To Withstand Warmer World. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071126152058.htm
US Department of Agriculture. "Breeding Heat Tolerant Beans To Withstand Warmer World." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071126152058.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Boy Attacked by Shark in Florida

Boy Attacked by Shark in Florida

Reuters - US Online Video (July 24, 2014) — An 8-year-old boy is bitten in the leg by a shark while vacationing at a Florida beach. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 24, 2014) — The eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo, mainly known for conflict and instability, is an unlikely place for the production of fine cheese. But a farm in the village of Masisi, in North Kivu is slowly transforming perceptions of the area. Known simply as Goma cheese, the Congolese version of Dutch gouda has gained popularity through out the region. Ciara Sutton reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tyrannosaur Pack-Hunting Theory Aided By New Footprints

Tyrannosaur Pack-Hunting Theory Aided By New Footprints

Newsy (July 24, 2014) — A new study claims a set of prehistoric T-Rex footprints supports the theory that the giant predators hunted in packs instead of alone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bill Gates: Health, Agriculture Key to Africa's Development

Bill Gates: Health, Agriculture Key to Africa's Development

AFP (July 24, 2014) — Health and agriculture development are key if African countries are to overcome poverty and grow, US software billionaire Bill Gates said Thursday, as he received an honourary degree in Ethiopia. Duration: 00:36 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:  

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile iPhone Android Web
          Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins