Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Multiple Species Of Bacteria May Cause Trachoma: Implications For Treatment

Date:
January 4, 2008
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Researchers have found that more than one species of bacteria may be causing the infectious eye disease trachoma. Six million people -- most of whom live in crowded and unhygienic conditions in the developing world -- are blind because of the disease and many more are actively infected. The possibility that multiple strains of the Chlamydiceae family of bacteria are involved in trachoma would involve a re-evaluation of vaccines and treatment programs.

Chlamydophila psittaci infection of HeLa 229 cells stained with a FITC-conjugated genus-specific anti-chlamdyial LPS monoclonal antibody; counter stain was Evans blue. Note multiple inclusions in a single cell. 1000x.
Credit: D Dean, RP Kandel, HK Adhikari, T Hessel

Researchers have found that more than one species of bacteria may be causing the infectious eye disease trachoma. Six million people -- most of whom live in crowded and unhygienic conditions in the developing world -- are blind because of the disease and many more are actively infected. The possibility that multiple strains of the Chlamydiceae family of bacteria are involved in trachoma would involve a re-evaluation of vaccines and treatment programmes.

Related Articles


It is accepted that Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) causes trachoma. The bacteria, some strains of which are associated with sexually transmitted infections, can also pass between people on hands and clothing; successive infections cause scarring of the inside of the eyelid. As the eyelashes of the infected eyes turn inward they scar the cornea - the transparent tissue covering the front of the eye - leading eventually to blindness.

To investigate whether other species of Chlamydiceae also cause human trachoma, Deborah Dean and colleagues from Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute and the University of California San Francisco conducted their research in the Lumbini Zone of south-western Nepal where the disease is endemic. Obtaining specimens from 146 individuals in 9 households, they found that a third of the people who had trachoma were infected with only C. trachomatis, including not only the type that is typically described in trachoma-infected eyes but also the type usually associated with sexually transmitted diseases.

Also, participants with Chlamidiacae infections of the eye were infected only with species previously associated with lung infections: one in five showed Chlamydophilia psittaci (C. psittaci) and one in ten Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae); infection with these strains was just as strongly linked with severe inflammation of the eyes as was infection with the C. trachomatis bacteria already known to cause trachoma. Additionally, one third of the individuals had a mixed infection with two or three species.

Interventions to prevent trachoma by improving personal hygiene -- such as the SAFE initiative promoted by the World Health Organization -- have had limited success, and an effective vaccine may also be needed to eliminate the disease. The findings and their distribution by household and age provide evidence that C. psittaci and C. pneumoniae, in addition to C. trachomatis, are involved with trachoma and that these infections are widespread rather than sporadic.

The findings would also explain why some people with active trachoma do not have C. trachomatis in their eyes, and suggest that antibiotics used for trachoma may need to be changed or used for longer periods of time to be effective against all three species. If these findings are confirmed in other trachoma-endemic regions, then future vaccines and treatments w ill need to combat all these bacteria and not just C. trachomatis.

Journal Citation: Dean D, Kandel RP, Adhikari HK, Hessel T (2008) Multiple Chlamydiaceae species in trachoma: implications for diseasepathogenesis and control. PLoS Med5(1): e14 http://medicine.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.pmed.0050014


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Multiple Species Of Bacteria May Cause Trachoma: Implications For Treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 January 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080102222851.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2008, January 4). Multiple Species Of Bacteria May Cause Trachoma: Implications For Treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080102222851.htm
Public Library of Science. "Multiple Species Of Bacteria May Cause Trachoma: Implications For Treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080102222851.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

AP (Dec. 18, 2014) As part of a six-month investigation of child maltreatment deaths, the AP found that hundreds of deaths from horrific abuse and neglect could have been prevented. AP's Haven Daley reports. (Dec. 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dads-To-Be Also Experience Hormone Changes During Pregnancy

Dads-To-Be Also Experience Hormone Changes During Pregnancy

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) A study from University of Michigan researchers found that expectant fathers see a decrease in testosterone as the baby's birth draws near. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) Harvard researchers found children whose mothers were exposed to high pollution levels in the third trimester were twice as likely to develop autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) Border closures, quarantines and crop losses in West African nations battling the Ebola virus could lead to as many as one million people going hungry, UN food agencies said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:52 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins