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Record Warm Summers Cause Extreme Ice Melt In Greenland

Date:
January 16, 2008
Source:
University of Sheffield
Summary:
Recent warm summers have caused the most extreme Greenland ice melting in 50 years. New research provides further evidence of a key impact of global warming and helps scientists place recent satellite observations of Greenland's shrinking ice mass in a longer-term climatic context.

Large iceberg in Greenland.
Credit: iStockphoto/Rob Broek

An international team of scientists, led by Dr Edward Hanna at the University of Sheffield, has demonstrated that recent warm summers have caused the most extreme Greenland ice melting in 50 years.

The new research provides further evidence of a key impact of global warming and helps scientists place recent satellite observations of Greenland´s shrinking ice mass in a longer-term climatic context.

Dr Hanna of the University´s Department of Geography, alongside some of the World´s leading Greenland glaciologists and climatologists, analysed a combination of key meteorological and glaciological records spanning a number of decades as part of the research.

The findings show how the Greenland Ice Sheet responded to more regional, rather than global, changes in climate between the 1960s and early 1990s. However the last fifteen years has seen an increase in ice melting and a striking correspondence of Greenland with global temperature variations, demonstrating Greenland´s recent response to global warming.

Summer 2003 was exceptionally warm around the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet, which resulted in the second-highest meltwater running off from the Ice Sheet of the last 50 years. Summer 2005 experienced a record-high melt, which was very recently superseded in summer 2007 – a year almost as warm as 2003.

The team of researchers includes some of the leading Greenland glaciologists and climatologists from the Free University of Brussels, University of Colorado, Danish Meteorological Institute and NASA Goddard Earth Science and Technology Center, University of Maryland Baltimore County, as well as four members of the University of Sheffield.

Dr Edward Hanna said: "Our work shows that global warming is beginning to take its toll on the Greenland Ice Sheet which, as a relict feature of the last Ice Age, has already been living on borrowed time and seems now to be in inexorable decline. The question is can we reduce greenhouse-gas emissions in time to make enough of a difference to curb this decay?"

The findings have been published in the 15 January 2008 issue of Journal of Climate.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Sheffield. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Sheffield. "Record Warm Summers Cause Extreme Ice Melt In Greenland." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 January 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080115102706.htm>.
University of Sheffield. (2008, January 16). Record Warm Summers Cause Extreme Ice Melt In Greenland. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080115102706.htm
University of Sheffield. "Record Warm Summers Cause Extreme Ice Melt In Greenland." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080115102706.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

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