Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Ventilator Treatment Strategies Examined For Patients With Severe Respiratory Disorders

Date:
February 12, 2008
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
A comparison of two treatment methods for critically ill patients with severe, rapid-onset lung disorders treated with mechanical ventilators found no significant difference in the risk of death, but did find that the newer method reduced the rates of severe persistent low oxygen levels and reduced the need for additional "rescue" therapies.

A comparison of two treatment methods for critically ill patients with severe, rapid-onset lung disorders treated with mechanical ventilators found no significant difference in the risk of death, but did find that the newer method reduced the rates of severe persistent low oxygen levels and reduced the need for additional "rescue" therapies, according to a new study.

Acute lung injury (such as from severe pneumonia or trauma) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS; the most serious form of acute lung injury), can be devastating complications of critical illness. Although mechanical ventilation provides essential life support, it can worsen lung injury. Low tidal volume (volume of air that is drawn with each breath) ventilation reduces the risk of death in critically ill patients with acute lung injury and ARDS. Adding therapies to effectively splint open collapsed lung segments may further reduce the risk of death, the authors write.

Maureen O. Meade, M.D., M.Sc., of Hamilton Health Sciences and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and colleagues examined the effect on death of an experimental "lung open ventilation" (LOV) strategy combining low tidal volumes, recruitment maneuvers (periodic sighs on the ventilator to open the lung) and high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; to keep the lung open) compared with an established low-tidal-volume strategy (control group) in 983 patients with moderate and severe lung injury. The randomized trial (the LOV study) was conducted between August 2000 and March 2006 in 30 intensive care units in Canada, Australia and Saudi Arabia.

All-cause hospital death rates were 36.4 percent in the experimental group and 40.4 percent in the control group. Barotrauma rates (injury to the lung caused by the pressure of the ventilator) were 11.2 percent and 9.1 percent, respectively.

"... for patients with acute lung injury and ARDS, we found similar mortality in patients with a multi-faceted protocolized lung-protective ventilation strategy designed to open the lung compared with an established low-tidal-volume protocolized ventilation strategy. We found no evidence of significant harm or increased risk of barotrauma despite the use of higher PEEP. In addition, the 'open-lung' strategy appeared to improve oxygenation, with fewer hypoxemia-related deaths and a lower use of rescue therapies by the treating clinicians. Our results, in combination with the two other major trials, justify use of higher PEEP levels as an alternative to the established low-PEEP, low-tidal-volume strategy," the authors write.

Journal reference: JAMA. 2008;299[6]:637-645.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Ventilator Treatment Strategies Examined For Patients With Severe Respiratory Disorders." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 February 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080212165423.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2008, February 12). Ventilator Treatment Strategies Examined For Patients With Severe Respiratory Disorders. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080212165423.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Ventilator Treatment Strategies Examined For Patients With Severe Respiratory Disorders." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080212165423.htm (accessed April 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, April 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) President Barack Obama gave a briefing Thursday announcing 8 million people have signed up under the Affordable Care Act. He blasted continued Republican efforts to repeal the law. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) A recent study links apathetic feelings to a smaller brain. Researchers say the results indicate a need for apathy screening for at-risk seniors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins