Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Tendon Complications, Though Rare, Linked To Statins, Study Shows

Date:
March 2, 2008
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
Statins, the most effective treatment for lowering cholesterol, are widely used and have been demonstrated to be safe in large clinical trials. Although side effects are usually mild, more severe side effects, especially musculoskeletal complications, have been reported. Tendon impairment has been reported anecdotally but has not been included in large-scale studies. A new study found that, although rare, tendon complications are linked to the use of statins.

Statins, the most effective treatment for lowering cholesterol, are widely used and have been demonstrated to be safe in large clinical trials. Although side effects are usually mild, more severe side effects, especially musculoskeletal complications, have been reported. Tendon impairment has been reported anecdotally but has not been included in large-scale studies. A new study published in the March issue of Arthritis Care & Research found that, although rare, tendon complications are linked to the use of statins.

Led by Catherine Noblet, of Rouen University Hospital in Rouen Cedex, France, researchers identified 96 cases of tendon complications from the French Pharmacovigilance database between 1990 and 2005 that were attributed to statins. Tendon conditions included tendonitis and tendon rupture. Patient data retrieved from computer database were as follows: medical history, other medications they were taking (especially those known to increase statin concentrations), information about the onset, pattern and severity of their condition, and the dosage and type of statin they took.

The results showed that of the 4,597 side effects associated with statins, about two percent were attributed to tendon complications. Symptoms usually occurred within 8 months of beginning statin therapy. Most patients had tendonitis, but some also suffered ruptured tendons. The most common tendon affected was the Achilles tendon, with pain, swelling, warmth, and stiffness as the most common symptoms. Seventeen of the patients had symptoms severe enough to warrant hospitalization. The researchers were able to link the tendon problems to statin use based on the fact that the symptoms appeared after the statins were started, they improved when the statins were stopped and they recurred in all of the patients who restarted the therapy.

The authors note that tendon complications due to statins may be largely unreported; no cases were reported during the large therapeutic trials that included more than 30,000 patients, but this may have been due to controlling for factors that predisposed patients to tendon conditions. In this study, an increasing number of patients with complications was seen with the increasing number of prescriptions between 1990 and 2005. They also note that although the prevalence of tendon problems in connection with statins is low, all types of statins could potentially cause tendon problems, which occurred at the recommended dosages.

"Our study suggests that regular tendinous clinical examination may be required in statin-treated patients, particularly during the first year following statin therapy initiation," the authors state. They also suggest that it is worth considering interrupting statin therapy before strenuous physical activity such as marathon running.

Although it is not known how statins may produce tendon injury, there are several theories. It may be that blocking cholesterol synthesis reduces the cholesterol content of tendon cell membranes, making them unstable, or that statins either reduce the levels of proteins involved in maintaining tendon cells or destroy vascular smooth muscle cells.

The authors suggest that although statins are effective, physicians should be aware that their side effects may include tendon complications. "We also suggest that patients who are at risk of developing statin-associated tendon manifestations and who require statins be routinely questioned about symptoms consistent with tendon involvement," they state, adding that postmarketing surveillance appears to be a major tool for early detection of safety problems with a new drug.

Article: "Tendinous Disorders Attributed to Statins: A Study on Ninety-Six Spontaneous Reports in the Period 1990-2005 and Review of the Literature," Isabelle Marie, Hιlθne Delafenκtre, Nathalie Massy, Christian Thuillez, Catherine Noblet, the Network of the French Pharmacovigilance Centers, Arthritis Care & Research, March 2008.

 


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "Tendon Complications, Though Rare, Linked To Statins, Study Shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 March 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080228080539.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2008, March 2). Tendon Complications, Though Rare, Linked To Statins, Study Shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080228080539.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "Tendon Complications, Though Rare, Linked To Statins, Study Shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080228080539.htm (accessed April 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, April 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Nine-Month-Old Baby Can't Open His Mouth

Newsy (Apr. 19, 2014) — Nine-month-old Wyatt Scott was born with a rare disorder called congenital trismus, which prevents him from opening his mouth. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) — In a potential breakthrough for future obesity treatments, scientists have used MRI scans to pinpoint brown fat in a living adult for the first time. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) — A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) — The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins