Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists Seek To Disarm TB's 'Molecular Weapon'

Date:
March 10, 2008
Source:
University of Leicester
Summary:
Researchers seek to gain edge in war against ancient foe, TB. They have isolated the molecular 'weapons' of the bacterium and are now assessing ways to make the bacterium impotent. They are focusing on two proteins in the TB bacterium which, it is thought, allows it to thrive in white blood cells.

The structure of the ESAT-6/CFP-10 complex. Note the 'long arm' on the right side of CFP-10. When this is intact, it allows the complex to attach to the outside of host white blood cells (central, the intense green shows a high amount of the complex binding). When the long arm is cleaved off, the complex shows greatly reduced attachment.
Credit: Copyright University of Leicester

Scientists at the University of Leicester are claiming a new advance in their fight against the resurgence of TB in Britain. They have isolated the molecular 'weapons' of the bacterium and are now assessing ways to make the bacterium impotent.

Related Articles


Scientists in the University's Department of Biochemistry are focusing on two proteins in the TB bacterium which, it is thought, allows it to thrive in white blood cells.

They are particularly examining a 'long arm' in a molecule of the bacterium which is thought to be used to bind onto white blood cells. The scientists are also seeking to identify which part of the white blood cell is being targeted.

Dr. Mark Carr, from the Department of Biochemistry said: "If you were to ask most people about TB, they would have most likely told you it was no longer a threat, merely a memory of a Britain with an undeveloped healthcare system.

"But TB is on the rise around the world with the number of new reported cases nearly doubling in the past 25 years. The World Health Organisation reported 8,500 instances in the UK in 2005.

"At the University of Leicester, our aim is to take the molecular 'weapons' of TB and isolate them, to understand their function and hopefully find a way to minimise their effects.

"One of the most important of these molecular weapons is known as the ESAT-6/CFP-10 complex. These are two proteins that bind together to become a functional unit, and it is thought that they may be needed to allow the bacteria to thrive inside white blood cells, as happens during the initial infection. Removal of the genes for this complex from the TB genome renders the bacteria unable to cause disease, exposing how important this particular weapon is to the bacteria.

"Similarly, studies of the structure of the protein complex have shown that removal of a 'long arm' from the molecule prevents the complex's ability to bind to the outer surface of human white blood cells. This data has provided us with a potential insight into the important components of this complex."

Dr. Carr added: "Current work is attempting to identify the exact components of the human white blood cells that this complex is targeting. Once found, this should give us a greater knowledge of the action of these molecular weapons of TB and give us the edge in the war against an ancient, reawakened foe."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Leicester. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Leicester. "Scientists Seek To Disarm TB's 'Molecular Weapon'." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 March 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080306075226.htm>.
University of Leicester. (2008, March 10). Scientists Seek To Disarm TB's 'Molecular Weapon'. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080306075226.htm
University of Leicester. "Scientists Seek To Disarm TB's 'Molecular Weapon'." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080306075226.htm (accessed November 25, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

AFP (Nov. 24, 2014) — Madagascar said Monday it is trying to contain an outbreak of plague -- similar to the Black Death that swept Medieval Europe -- that has killed 40 people and is spreading to the capital Antananarivo. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) — A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins