Science News
from research organizations

New Industrial-scale Process For Making Big Molecules With A Big Future

Date:
March 20, 2008
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists are reporting discovery of a new method that will enable manufacturers to produce industrial-size batches of dendrimers for the first time. Dendrimers are giant molecules with tree-like branches with a range of potentially valuable commercial and industrial applications. Dendrimers can be produced in custom-designed shapes, sizes, structures and weights suitable for specific uses.
Share:
       
FULL STORY

Enormous molecules called dendrimers could serve a variety of functions, including improving drug delivery to materials. Scientists report a method to manufacture them on an industrial scale for the first time.
Credit: Courtesy of the American Chemical Society

Scientists are reporting discovery of a new method that will enable manufacturers to produce industrial-size batches of dendrimers for the first time. Dendrimers are giant molecules with tree-like branches with a range of potentially valuable commercial and industrial applications.

Dendrimers can be produced in custom-designed shapes, sizes, structures and weights suitable for specific uses. Those potential applications range from drug delivery and gene transfer to new materials, coatings, sensors, and herbicides. But because they require multiple steps to make, dendrimers are difficult to produce on an industrial scale.

In their new study, Abdellatif Chouai and Eric E. Simanek describe a practical large-scale synthesis of dendrimers that sidestep this barrier. Their method yields a so-called "uncommitted intermediate," a dendrimer scaffolding that can be built upon in countless ways. This intermediate "can be elaborated into a wealth of diagnostic and therapeutic dendrimers -- some of which are currently being explored in our laboratory," the researchers add.

Journal reference:  "Kilogram-Scale Synthesis of a Second-Generation Dendrimer Based on 1,3,5-Triazine Using Green and Industrially Compatible Methods with a Single Chromatographic Step". The Journal of Organic Chemistry. March 21, 2008. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jo702462t)


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "New Industrial-scale Process For Making Big Molecules With A Big Future." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 March 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080317114243.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2008, March 20). New Industrial-scale Process For Making Big Molecules With A Big Future. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080317114243.htm
American Chemical Society. "New Industrial-scale Process For Making Big Molecules With A Big Future." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080317114243.htm (accessed June 30, 2015).

Share This Page: