Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cotton Studies Target Killer: Fusarium Wilt

Date:
March 25, 2008
Source:
US Department of Agriculture
Summary:
The long, warm days of a typical California summer make life easy for sun-loving cotton plants. But a fungal enemy that causes what's known as Fusarium wilt can make things tough for the plants--and for growers' balance sheets, too.

Cotton plants free of Fusarium wilt have a better chance of producing high yields than do plants infected with this fungus.
Credit: Photo courtesy of National Cotton Council of America

The long, warm days of a typical California summer make life easy for sun-loving cotton plants. But a fungal enemy that causes what's known as Fusarium wilt can make things tough for the plants—and for growers' balance sheets, too.

That's why Agricultural Research Service (ARS) plant pathologist Rebecca S. Bennett is researching environmentally friendly ways to fight the fungus. Bennett works at the ARS Western Integrated Cropping Systems Research Unit in Shafter, Calif.

Researchers know the troublesome fungus as Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum, or FOV race 4. A soil-dweller that was first detected in California in 2001, FOV race 4 can clog a plant’s "plumbing," or vascular system, eventually causing its leaves to yellow, wilt and die. Yields of the afflicted plant's fluffy white bolls may plummet.

In a 3-year study, Bennett is looking at solarization, in which soil covered with plastic tarps might capture enough heat from the sun's rays to kill the fungus. Though solarization is likely too expensive to use on a widespread basis on cotton fields, it might be economical for spot-treating highly infested sites, Bennett said.

Bennett also is collaborating with plant pathologist Tom Gordon of the University of California-Davis on an indoor study of the microbe. In that experiment, Fusarium will be specially equipped with a gene that gives it a bright green glow when viewed with ultraviolet light in the lab. The telltale glow will make it easier for Bennett and Gordon to spy on the fungus and, perhaps, to find a way to bring about its demise.

Related work by other scientists at Shafter and elsewhere focuses on a different strategy: to breed superior cotton plants that have impressive natural resistance to the microbe.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by US Department of Agriculture. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

US Department of Agriculture. "Cotton Studies Target Killer: Fusarium Wilt." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 March 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080321125116.htm>.
US Department of Agriculture. (2008, March 25). Cotton Studies Target Killer: Fusarium Wilt. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080321125116.htm
US Department of Agriculture. "Cotton Studies Target Killer: Fusarium Wilt." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080321125116.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Plants & Animals News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How to Make Single Serving Smoothies: Howdini Hacks

How to Make Single Serving Smoothies: Howdini Hacks

Howdini (July 24, 2014) Smoothies are a great way to get in lots of healthy ingredients, plus they taste great! Howdini has a trick for making the perfect single-size smoothie that will save you time on cleanup too! All you need is a blender and a mason jar. Video provided by Howdini
Powered by NewsLook.com
Boy Attacked by Shark in Florida

Boy Attacked by Shark in Florida

Reuters - US Online Video (July 24, 2014) An 8-year-old boy is bitten in the leg by a shark while vacationing at a Florida beach. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Goma Cheese Brings Whiff of New Hope to DRC

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 24, 2014) The eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo, mainly known for conflict and instability, is an unlikely place for the production of fine cheese. But a farm in the village of Masisi, in North Kivu is slowly transforming perceptions of the area. Known simply as Goma cheese, the Congolese version of Dutch gouda has gained popularity through out the region. Ciara Sutton reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tyrannosaur Pack-Hunting Theory Aided By New Footprints

Tyrannosaur Pack-Hunting Theory Aided By New Footprints

Newsy (July 24, 2014) A new study claims a set of prehistoric T-Rex footprints supports the theory that the giant predators hunted in packs instead of alone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins