Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Armed Beetles Find A Mate, Whatever Their Size

Date:
March 31, 2008
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
One species of armed beetle is proving that size doesn't necessarily matter when it comes to finding a mate. The creature uses rather effective "pulling techniques."

Librodor japonicus.
Credit: Copyright Kensuke Okada

One species of armed beetle is proving that size doesn't necessarily matter when it comes to finding a mate. The creature uses what might be considered rather persuasive 'pulling techniques.'

Related Articles


In the world of armed beetles, biggest is usually best, as males often fight for mating rights and those with the largest jaws beat off the competition. However, this is not always the case with one particular species.

Researchers at Okayama University in Japan have been monitoring the mating habits of large, medium and small Librodor japonicus males, and found that this particular species adopts a different tactic to finding a mate depending on the size of certain body parts.

The largest male beetles wait for females at the feeding areas and fight for the right to mate -- the males with the biggest jaws stand the best chance of winning. The medium sized beetles which are too small to beat the bigger males have developed relatively bigger wings than their larger counterparts, and they use these to search for the feeding sites which are unoccupied by large males.

The smallest male beetles have adopted a completely different tactic -- they stay at the feeding sites with the big males, and attempt 'sneaky matings' with females behind the bigger male's backs. What's more, these males have relatively larger testes and produce sperm that is more competitive than the bigger males.

The L. japonicus beetles have ensured that, through their size-determined mating tactics, they all have a chance of finding a mate, and sometimes with no fighting involved.

Researcher Takahisa Miyatake said, "Although other studies of armed beetles have observed 2 different sizes of males, we have shown that males can adopt up to three different behavioural tactics to improve their mating success."

Full details of the Librodor japonicus research is outlined in the article Fighting, dispersing, and sneaking: body-size dependent mating tactics by male Librodor japonicus beetles in the April issue of Ecological Entomology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "Armed Beetles Find A Mate, Whatever Their Size." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 March 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080327172119.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2008, March 31). Armed Beetles Find A Mate, Whatever Their Size. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080327172119.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "Armed Beetles Find A Mate, Whatever Their Size." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080327172119.htm (accessed December 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Sunday, December 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Nevada Farmer Uses Goats to 'recycle' Christmas Trees

Nevada Farmer Uses Goats to 'recycle' Christmas Trees

Reuters - US Online Video (Dec. 27, 2014) A Nevada goat farmer partners up with a local fire department to 'recycle' discarded Christmas trees. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Breeding Christmas Trees Without Needle Mess

Breeding Christmas Trees Without Needle Mess

AP (Dec. 26, 2014) The presents are unwrapped. Now it's time for another Yuletide tradition: cleaning up the needles that are falling off your Christmas tree. Scientist hope to make that process a ghost of Christmas past. (Dec. 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Venemous White Cobra Gets New Home

Venemous White Cobra Gets New Home

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Dec. 24, 2014) A venemous white cobra gets a new home at the San Diego Zoo, following a dramatic capture and months of quarantine. Sharon Reich reports Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Christmas Trees And Bugs Are Seemingly Symbiotic

Christmas Trees And Bugs Are Seemingly Symbiotic

Newsy (Dec. 24, 2014) The National Christmas Tree Association says bugs in trees are a relatively small problem, but recommends giving your tree a good shake anyway. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins