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Twin Findings Raise Hopes Of Improved Anemia Treatments

Date:
April 16, 2008
Source:
Western Australian Institute for Medical Research
Summary:
A new understanding of how red blood cell production is controlled could lead to improvements in the treatment of the blood disorder anemia, according to medical researchers.

A new understanding of how red blood cell production is controlled could lead to improvements in the treatment of the blood disorder anaemia, according to West Australian medical researchers.

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The findings are reported in two papers published in Blood, the journal of the American Society of Hematology, by a group of Australian scientists, led by Western Australian Institute for Medical Research (WAIMR) Director Peter Klinken and his Laboratory for Cancer Medicine.

One of the papers shows how the gene Hls5, which was discovered by Professor Klinken's team, affects red cell production.

"We have established that Hls5 impedes the maturation of immature red blood cells which has provided us with a much better understanding of what Hls5 does and how it is linked with the development of leukaemias and cancers," he said.

"Another arm of our research has revealed that thyroid hormone, which it was already established affected metabolism, also contributes to red blood cell formation -- which was previously unknown."

Professor Klinken said both findings opened the door to exploring new ways of treating a range of anaemias.

"Anaemias develop where a person's blood is low in red blood cells so the two discoveries we have made may provide an insight into how to turn these conditions around," he said.

"Our findings indicate that minor changes in Hls5 levels can have a big impact and so the possibility of modulating this gene to generate new treatments is significant.

"As a number of patients don't respond to erythropoietin (EPO) -- the current form of hormone therapy for anaemias -- this new knowledge will hopefully lead to alternative treatments."

The research being conducted by Professor Klinken and his team is funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council and ASX-listed Perth-based biotechnology company BioPharmica.

Anaemia occurs when the amount of haemoglobin (which is found in red blood cells) drops below normal. Haemoglobin is necessary for the transportation of oxygen throughout the body.

It can be caused by iron or vitamin deficiency, blood loss, a chronic illness, a genetic or acquired defect or disease or through the use of some medications.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Western Australian Institute for Medical Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Western Australian Institute for Medical Research. "Twin Findings Raise Hopes Of Improved Anemia Treatments." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 April 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080411101952.htm>.
Western Australian Institute for Medical Research. (2008, April 16). Twin Findings Raise Hopes Of Improved Anemia Treatments. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080411101952.htm
Western Australian Institute for Medical Research. "Twin Findings Raise Hopes Of Improved Anemia Treatments." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080411101952.htm (accessed March 31, 2015).

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