Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Twin Findings Raise Hopes Of Improved Anemia Treatments

Date:
April 16, 2008
Source:
Western Australian Institute for Medical Research
Summary:
A new understanding of how red blood cell production is controlled could lead to improvements in the treatment of the blood disorder anemia, according to medical researchers.

A new understanding of how red blood cell production is controlled could lead to improvements in the treatment of the blood disorder anaemia, according to West Australian medical researchers.

Related Articles


The findings are reported in two papers published in Blood, the journal of the American Society of Hematology, by a group of Australian scientists, led by Western Australian Institute for Medical Research (WAIMR) Director Peter Klinken and his Laboratory for Cancer Medicine.

One of the papers shows how the gene Hls5, which was discovered by Professor Klinken's team, affects red cell production.

"We have established that Hls5 impedes the maturation of immature red blood cells which has provided us with a much better understanding of what Hls5 does and how it is linked with the development of leukaemias and cancers," he said.

"Another arm of our research has revealed that thyroid hormone, which it was already established affected metabolism, also contributes to red blood cell formation -- which was previously unknown."

Professor Klinken said both findings opened the door to exploring new ways of treating a range of anaemias.

"Anaemias develop where a person's blood is low in red blood cells so the two discoveries we have made may provide an insight into how to turn these conditions around," he said.

"Our findings indicate that minor changes in Hls5 levels can have a big impact and so the possibility of modulating this gene to generate new treatments is significant.

"As a number of patients don't respond to erythropoietin (EPO) -- the current form of hormone therapy for anaemias -- this new knowledge will hopefully lead to alternative treatments."

The research being conducted by Professor Klinken and his team is funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council and ASX-listed Perth-based biotechnology company BioPharmica.

Anaemia occurs when the amount of haemoglobin (which is found in red blood cells) drops below normal. Haemoglobin is necessary for the transportation of oxygen throughout the body.

It can be caused by iron or vitamin deficiency, blood loss, a chronic illness, a genetic or acquired defect or disease or through the use of some medications.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Western Australian Institute for Medical Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Western Australian Institute for Medical Research. "Twin Findings Raise Hopes Of Improved Anemia Treatments." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 April 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080411101952.htm>.
Western Australian Institute for Medical Research. (2008, April 16). Twin Findings Raise Hopes Of Improved Anemia Treatments. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080411101952.htm
Western Australian Institute for Medical Research. "Twin Findings Raise Hopes Of Improved Anemia Treatments." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080411101952.htm (accessed December 25, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, December 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

French General Physicians Begin Strike, ER Doctors Back to Work

French General Physicians Begin Strike, ER Doctors Back to Work

AFP (Dec. 23, 2014) French doctors went on strike Tuesday in protest at an upcoming health bill. Emergency room doctors on the other end are returning to work after reaching an historic agreement. Duration: 01:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Malpractice Suit Changes Rule for Cruise Ships

Malpractice Suit Changes Rule for Cruise Ships

AP (Dec. 23, 2014) A recent court ruling may have opened the courthouse door for cruise ship passengers who claim poor treatment by ship medical personnel. (Dec. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are Paper Books Better Than E-Books For Sleep Cycle?

Are Paper Books Better Than E-Books For Sleep Cycle?

Newsy (Dec. 23, 2014) A study from Harvard Medical School shows that electronic readers utilizing LED technology interrupt people's natural sleep cycles. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Christmas Kissing Good for Health

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 22, 2014) Scientists in Amsterdam say couples transfer tens of millions of microbes when they kiss, encouraging healthy exposure to bacteria. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins