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Link Between Sleep Fragmentation And Daytime Napping In Older Adults

Date:
May 1, 2008
Source:
American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Summary:
Deficiencies in nighttime sleep are associated with daytime napping in older adults.
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Deficiencies in nighttime sleep are associated with daytime napping in older adults, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of the journal SLEEP.

Suzanne E. Goldman, PhD, of Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues measured the nighttime and daytime sleep of 235 individuals (average age: 80.1 years) with wrist actigraphy, or a method of monitoring human rest/activity cycles and is useful for determining sleep patterns and circadian rhythms, and sleep diaries for an average of 6.8 nights.

According to the results, naps of at least five minutes were recorded in sleep diaries by 75.7 percent of the participants. The odds for napping were higher for individuals with higher levels of nighttime fragmentation, respiratory symptoms, diabetes, and pain. Self-reported diabetes was associated with a 43 percent longer nap duration, while self-report of any pain was associated with 27.5 percent shorter nap duration. This study also suggested that each hour of previous night's sleep time was associated with a 4.1 percent longer sleep time the next night (nap night), and each hour of napping (the next day) was associated with 10.2 percent less sleep on the night of the nap.

"Our study is important both clinically and for future research. It points out the need for health care providers to discuss nighttime sleep and daytime napping with older individuals. It also points out the need to identify the causes of disturbed nighttime sleep in order to determine appropriate treatment. Our study suggests that that older adults nap because of health problems and disrupted sleep at night. Thus the napping may reflect needed sleep," said Dr. Goldman.

Not sleeping well can lead to a number of problems. Older adults who have poor nighttime sleep are more likely to have a depressed mood, attention and memory problems, excessive daytime sleepiness, more nighttime falls and use more over-the-counter or prescription sleep aids. In addition, recent studies associate lack of sleep with serious health problems such as an increased risk of obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

For a copy of this article, entitled, "Association Between Nighttime Sleep and Napping in Older Adults", or to arrange an interview with an AASM spokesperson regarding this study, please contact Jim Arcuri, public relations coordinator, at (708)492-0930, ext. 9317, or .org.


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The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Link Between Sleep Fragmentation And Daytime Napping In Older Adults." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 May 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080501062805.htm>.
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (2008, May 1). Link Between Sleep Fragmentation And Daytime Napping In Older Adults. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080501062805.htm
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Link Between Sleep Fragmentation And Daytime Napping In Older Adults." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080501062805.htm (accessed May 29, 2015).

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