Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Counting Immune Cells On A 'Protein Printboard'

Date:
May 21, 2008
Source:
University of Twente
Summary:
In order to monitor how far an HIV infection has progressed, the number of immune cells – lymphocytes – must be counted. Researchers have developed a method that neatly arranges the antibodies that bind to these immune cells on a ‘molecular printboard’.

In order to monitor how far an HIV infection has progressed, the number of immune cells – lymphocytes – must be counted. Researchers at the University of Twente have developed a method that neatly arranges the antibodies that bind to these immune cells on a ‘molecular printboard’.

The researchers are publishing this key step in the road towards antibody-based sensors in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

The researchers have succeeded in neatly lining up proteins on a surface. The process also allows patterns of various types of proteins to be created. The proteins do not bind to the surface directly but via so-called ‘linkers’; these are molecules that organize themselves and create structure. This technology has interesting medical applications, as it allows the creation of a surface with antibodies - proteins that allow antigens to be detected in blood.

The presence of antigens provides information about diseases or disease progression. Good detection relies entirely on highly specific binding. The odds of ‘incorrect’ bonds being formed is minimized by this new method.

Cell count

Cells can also be bound to such a ‘protein printboard’ by using the characteristic proteins found on the outside of a cell. This cell adhesion is important in processes like counting immune cells – lymphocytes – to monitor the progression of an HIV infection. Highly specific binding is required to ensure reliable results.

Thanks to the regular arrangement made possible by self-organization, researchers also achieve highly specific binding, minimizing the chances of errors. According to the researchers, this opens the door to low cost cell count systems.

The research was performed by the Molecular Nanofabrication (MESA+) and Biophysical Engineering (MESA+ and BMTI) groups. They cooperated with the Agrotechnology & Food Innovations group of the Wageningen University and Research Center.



Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Twente. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Manon Ludden, Xiao Li, Jan Greve, Aart van Amerongen, Maryana Escalante, Vinod Subramaniam, David N. Reinhoudt en Jurriaan Huskens. Assembly of Bionanostructures onto β-Cyclodextrin Molecular Printboards for Antibody Recognition and Lymphocyte Cell Counting. Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS).

Cite This Page:

University of Twente. "Counting Immune Cells On A 'Protein Printboard'." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 May 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080520212615.htm>.
University of Twente. (2008, May 21). Counting Immune Cells On A 'Protein Printboard'. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080520212615.htm
University of Twente. "Counting Immune Cells On A 'Protein Printboard'." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080520212615.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Snack Attack: Study Says Action Movies Make You Snack More

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) You're more likely to gain weight while watching action flicks than you are watching other types of programming, says a new study published in JAMA. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

U.N. Says Ebola Travel Restrictions Will Cause Food Shortage

Newsy (Sep. 2, 2014) The U.N. says the problem is two-fold — quarantine zones and travel restrictions are limiting the movement of both people and food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins