Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Nurses With Adverse Work Schedules Have Poor Sleep, Which Can Affect Their Work Performance

Date:
June 9, 2008
Source:
American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Summary:
Sleep quality and quantity among nurses is negatively influenced by adverse work schedules and additional home demands. These results have implications for both worker and patient safety, as sleep adequacy affects job performance.

Sleep quality and quantity among nurses is negatively influenced by adverse work schedules and additional home demands. These results have implications for both worker and patient safety, as sleep adequacy affects job performance, according to a research abstract that will be presented on June 9 at SLEEP 2008, the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS).

The study, authored by Jeanne Geiger-Brown, PhD, of the University of Maryland, focused on 2,273 registered nurses. Work schedule variables, including hours per day and per week, days per week, weekends/month, shift typically worked, quick returns (less than 10 hours off between shifts), mandatory overtime, on-call, and circadian mismatch were analyzed. Sleep was measured by two items: "My sleep was restless" and "I got less sleep than I thought I should", with responses divided to three or more nights per week as the indicator. Respondents were also asked about home demands, including time spent on child care, dependent elderly care, and domestic chores.

According to the results, having inadequate sleep on three or more nights per week is associated with schedule-related poor sleep opportunity. Specifically, shift work, mandatory overtime, and on-call, quick returns, and long shifts increase the odds of having insufficient sleep. The worse the schedule, the worse the sleep for most nurses.

"Inadequate sleep has both short-term (needlestick injuries and musculoskeletal disorders) and long-term (cardiovascular and metabolic diseases) health consequences for nurses, and possibly for the patients that they serve," said Dr. Geiger-Brown. "Adequate sleep is critical to providing quality patient care."

It is recommended that adults get between seven and eight hours of nightly sleep.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Nurses With Adverse Work Schedules Have Poor Sleep, Which Can Affect Their Work Performance." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080609071359.htm>.
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (2008, June 9). Nurses With Adverse Work Schedules Have Poor Sleep, Which Can Affect Their Work Performance. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080609071359.htm
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Nurses With Adverse Work Schedules Have Poor Sleep, Which Can Affect Their Work Performance." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080609071359.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) A disease that has killed more than six million cave-dwelling bats in the United States is on the move and wildlife biologists are worried. White Nose Syndrome, discovered in New York in 2006, has now spread to 25 states. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) That little voice telling you to exercise, get in shape and get healthy is probably coming from your boss. More companies are beefing up wellness programs to try and cut down their health care costs. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Blood From World's Oldest Woman Suggests Life Limit

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) Scientists say for the extremely elderly, their stem cells might reach a state of exhaustion. This could limit one's life span. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) The Food and Drug Administration wants to crack down on the use of e-cigarettes, banning the sale of the product to minors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins